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Minister recognises Cornwall’s work to reduce fuel poverty by 5,000 homes

Fri, 07/20/2018 - 14:44

Recent figures released by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) show that Cornwall has reduced fuel poverty by over 5,000 homes in a year.

On a visit to Cornwall by Minister of State for Energy and Clean Growth Claire Perry visited Cornwall today (Friday 20 July) to learn about Cornwall’s Winter Wellbeing Partnership work in reducing fuel poverty levels.

By 2030 Cornwall Council’s ambition is to remove a further 22,000 homes from fuel poverty.

Led by Cornwall Council working with a range of partners, the programme is making a real difference to people’s lives.

Claire Perry met residents who have benefited from the Warm and Well Cornwall programme which helps residents who are suffering from ill health and living in a cold and damp home to have first time central heating installed and insulation improvements.

Cornwall Council and social landlords have match funded £3.5million investment from the National Grid’s Warm Homes Fund.

Cornwall Council’s 2015  Devolution Deal was a key factor in unlocking funding to find better ways of working to help people who would not traditionally have received help under previous funded programmes.

The visit to Cornwall also featured a briefing on the Winter Wellbeing partnership, made up of over 30 organisations, to address fuel poverty.

Each winter the partners provide residents with help from emergency heating funds, advice on better insulation, switching tariffs, providing first time central heating systems and support to find employment.

The Winter Wellbeing partnership launched in 2010 and has helped 7,400 homes and prevented 818 hospital admissions. In the last year alone NHS saved £61,000 based on 63 hospital admissions prevented – every £1 Winter Wellness investment saved the NHS £3.15.

In 2017 Cornwall Council’s Wellbeing and Public Health team was funded by BEIS to work in partnership with Citizen’s Advice to develop two toolkits which would help local authorities and health services to tackle fuel poverty across England.

This week, following the success of the Energy Price Cap Bill through Parliament, the Government also announced that its flagship energy efficiency scheme will be 100% focused on helping improve over 1 million low income and vulnerable households by 2022. The cap, which will protect millions of households from unjustified price rises and poor value deals on their energy bills, coupled with the £6 billion energy efficiency scheme will help build an energy market that puts consumers at its heart and ensures that those most at risk of fuel poverty are protected.

Cornwall Council Leader Adam Paynter said: “Cornwall has been leading the way in tackling fuel poverty, and our programmes are held in high esteem nationally. They are providing real solutions to real people and making a difference to everyday lives. A warm and well home is a key foundation to people’s wellbeing and we’re proud to be contributing to reduced hospital admissions in the process.”

Claire Perry Minister of State for Energy and Clean Growth said “Yesterday’s changes to the flagship ECO scheme will increase the proportion of the scheme that can be delivered with local authorities up to 25%. Combined with the scheme’s new innovation requirement, this will help Cornwall Council to work with Sarah Newton MP to give Cornish residents the ability to live warm and well.”

Sarah Newton, MP for Truro and Falmouth said: “Ensuring local people live in warm homes is a top priority for me, that’s why I’m thrilled that Cornwall is leading the way in tackling fuel poverty. I have been part of the Winter Wellbeing Partnership work and Warm and Well Cornwall programme for some time and am pleased with the progress we are making. Today we’ve seen first-hand that installing the right heating and insulation can make a significant difference to the health and wellbeing of residents. The Government is committed to ending fuel poverty and I am delighted that yesterday’s announcements will enable the Partnership in Cornwall to enable many more people live in warm homes”.

John Pettigrew, Chief Executive of National Grid said: “The aim of our fund is threefold; to help to reduce bills, make fuel poor households warmer, and improve the health of people suffering the most severe levels of fuel poverty. “Around 4.5 million households across the country are in fuel poverty with people not able to heat their homes enough to stay warm and healthy. Many are struggling on low incomes and are relying on heating systems that are expensive to run or don’t heat their homes properly. In many cases, because of their circumstances or the type of property they live in, they can’t apply for existing grant schemes.”

“National Grid is making this significant voluntary contribution of £150m and has established the Warm Homes Fund in recognition of the challenges that people face living in cold, damp and energy inefficient homes.”

Jeremy Nesbitt, Managing Director Affordable Warmth Solutions added: “Solving the issues associated with Fuel Poverty continues to challenge many of our stakeholders and we are delighted to see the minister visit this exciting initiative and showing her support for the Warm and Well Programme that with our support is already making a difference to the lives of residents of Cornwall.”

Posted on 20 July 2018

Categories: Cornwall

Safer Penzance increases presence in town in response to concerns about anti-social behaviour

Fri, 07/20/2018 - 14:37

Anti-social behaviour workers will be increasing patrols in Penzance and police are set to hold drop in sessions in the town centre following concerns raised by the local community.

During this week's public meeting in Penzance, members of the local community voiced concerns about street drinking and anti-social behaviour, as well as drug paraphernalia discarded in the town centre. As a result, this week members of Cornwall Council’s Anti-Social Behaviour team and the police have stepped up joint patrols in Penzance, and the Council’s Drug and Alcohol Action Team has brought in additional outreach support. Towards the end of the month the police will begin drop in sessions for members of the public to share any concerns they have.

As lighter nights and warmer temperatures tend to draw out those who are more likely to engage in anti-social behaviour, PCSOs are regularly visiting known hot spots, while police officers and the Council's Anti-Social Behaviour Team are also carrying out additional patrols.

While there is not an outright ban on people drinking alcohol in the street, Penzance town centre - like all towns across Cornwall - is covered by a Public Space Protection Order (PSPO) which gives police the power to require an individual to stop drinking or surrender alcohol.

“We are aware of the concern in the town about the increase in bad behaviour on the streets and are working closely with our colleagues in the Safer Penzance partnership to do what we can to discourage this behaviour," said Penzance police inspector, Nicholas Clarke. "But to do this we must be told at the time a problem is occurring so we have the opportunity to deal with it.

"Recent commentary on social media and in local media suggests that not all crime is being reported to the police at the time it occurs, and in some cases it is not being reported at all. We need people to report issues to us direct."

Repeat offenders are being tackled by Cornwall Council's anti-social behaviour caseworkers who, working with the police, have issued Criminal Behaviour Orders (CBO) to seven repeat offenders over the last 12 months. CBOs are not only used to place restrictions on someone to deter them from repeating anti-social behaviour, but also are a way to require people to engage with drug or alcohol treatment services. A number of arrests for breaches of this order have been made.

As of today, the Penzance policing area reports overall crime seeing a 24% increase as compared to last year. The police report that this general increase is in line with a national trend and takes into account changes to crime classifications. A large majority of these figures relate to improved reporting of offences such as malicious communications and harassment. However, both shoplifting and robberies within the town have reduced since last year.

Tackling the root causes of anti-social behaviour is key to resolving issues in the long term, and agencies need time and resources to achieve this, explained Sue James, Cornwall Council cabinet member for environment and public protection.

"We are all very aware of the issues in Penzance and while there might be a perception that little is being done, Safer Penzance is taking action," she said.

"The partnership understands and is acting on the concerns raised. Multi-agency patrols are in place, and we will be working with businesses and residents in the local community to raise awareness of how to report issues and the work underway to address concerns.

"We know that just moving people on does not deliver a sustainable or safe solution and that we have to assertively engage people in treatment. As of this week our Drug and Alcohol Action Team has recruited another assertive outreach worker to engage with individuals in Penzance and reduce the harm they may be causing to themselves and others."

Cllr Dick Cliffe, Penzance Town Mayor, said; “Success is going to require more and deeper partnership working to make the most of limited resources.  We are exploring with Cornwall Council having Penzance ASB and Community Safety officers based in the Town Centre.  Penzance BID is prepared to locate their BID Manager with them and the Town Council is considering funding a Town Centre Manager also to be collocated with them.  A Town Centre management office would make reporting and responding to ASB much more efficient. The police have also committed to using this office and holding surgeries there.

“We are also working with Cornwall Council and the Police over reviewing the Penzance Public Space Protection Order to ensure it covers all of the unwanted behaviours and is simple to enforce.

“The drug abuse issue is by far the most difficult issue to deal with. I believe the starting point has to be education of community leaders. Rampant drug misuse has been the elephant in the room that nobody speaks about – we need to acknowledge this in order to move on.  We can do something about drug litter in the short term.”

However, to trigger these responses, residents can help by reporting through the right routes:

  • If people experience anti-social behaviour, email 101@dc.police.uk or call 101 for non-emergencies and in an emergency call 999.
  • If you have information about a crime you can also contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.
  • For concerns about drug paraphernalia, such as needles, on the street, email Cornwall Council Refuse and Recycling refuseandrecycling@cornwall.gov.uk or call 0300 1234 141.
  • Sign up to Devon & Cornwall Alert  and keep track of crime in your local area
  • Follow Penzance neighbourhood website
Categories: Cornwall

Hot topics on the table at Cabinet next week

Fri, 07/20/2018 - 14:24

Transforming adult care for residents, a plan to extend the living wage and the future of air links between Cornwall and London will all be up for discussion when the Cabinet meets at New County Hall in Truro next week.

Proposals on the agenda include a plan for the Council to achieve Living Wage Foundation accreditation by spring next year, which will improve the pay of workers in a wide range of roles including care workers. The Living Wage Foundation sets its own living wage rates, which are higher than the Government’s own levels, with a minimum hourly rate of £8.75.

Although Cornwall Council already pays its direct staff the recommended living wage, the proposal would see steps taken to ensure all contracted staff are also paid to the same level.

Councillor Julian German, Portfolio holder for resources, said:  “The council has already committed to paying its direct staff the Living Wage Foundation’s Living Wage (LWFLW), and now we are looking at how we can secure accreditation for our work.”

Cabinet will also discuss the next steps for transforming adult social care in Cornwall. With a growing number of adults relying on some form of social care, increasing demands on the budget and the need to find savings, a proposal for step change in delivering more efficient services is on the table.

Portfolio Holder for Adults, Rob Rotchell said: “Cornwall must fundamentally transform and improve the way services are delivered if we are to avoid cutting services to vulnerable adults. Ensuring this is done in the most efficient and evidence-based way will put the Council in a much stronger position to meet future and help people to age well rather than relying on residential care.”

Also up for discussion will be the renewal of the Public Service Obligation (PSO) between Cornwall Airport Newquay and London.  The obligation first came into effect in 2014 when Flybe signed a four-year contract to maintain the service, which had been under threat of closure.

That contract ends this autumn, and bids have been received to continue a service between Newquay and London.  Cabinet will decide how to move forward once the scheme is given the go ahead by the Department of Transport, who are expected to make a decision on it in September.

Councillor Geoff Brown, Portfolio holder for transport, said:  “This is a really important issue for the whole of Cornwall, and we believe it could cost businesses around £50m if we were to lose the PSO. It is vital we are in a position to move forward as soon as we get the go-ahead from the Department of Transport.”

Other items on the Cabinet agenda include a review of the Council Performance Report and Capital Programme Outturn Review.

Members of the public are able to attend the Cabinet meeting in person at New County Hall, or can watch the meeting via a live webcast.

Members of the public can also submit questions no later than midday two clear working days before the meeting.

Categories: Cornwall

We're supporting the #2MinuteBeachClean

Wed, 07/18/2018 - 15:48

More beachgoers will be able to do their bit for the environment and help rid our coastline of litter after the Council teamed up with Cormac and Clean Cornwall to support the popular #2MinuteBeachClean project.

The three organisations have funded twenty-four #2MinuteBeachClean boards which have now taken up residence at coastal locations from Penzance to Bude, bringing the total number of boards in Cornwall to 44.

Find out more about the #2MinuteBeachClean project and your nearest board

With more people than ever before aware of the impact litter has on the marine environment, the #2MinuteBeachClean boards make it easier for everyone to do their bit.

Each board is lovingly cared for by a 'Board Guardian'. Volunteers from a range of local businesses and organisations including beach cafes, tourist information centres, surf schools and community groups keep the boards stocked with litter pickers and bags or buckets.  The boards are close to litter bins so that those taking part can easily dispose of any rubbish collected.

Last year, a Council survey of beach litter revealed that 10% had been left behind by beach visitors, 60% came from fishing and shipping and 30% had deteriorated to such an extent that its origins could not be identified.

Councillor Sue James, Cabinet portfolio holder for environment and public protection said the survey highlighted the extent of marine and beach debris harms wildlife and damages habitats.

"Of course the best course of action is that people don’t litter in the first place, but the #2MinuteBeachClean provides an opportunity for people to give whatever time they have to help make a difference and show others that litter is not on,” she said. “If lots of people put in a little time it all adds up! While we have contributed towards the cost of the boards, we would not have been able to support this initiative without the help of our wonderful board guardians. This shows that the people of Cornwall really do care about their environment and want to play a part in keeping Cornwall beautiful."    

Ben Pyle, from Cormac, said: “Every contribution helps, which makes the #2minutebeachclean more relevant than ever. Every plastic item properly disposed of is one item less likely to find its way into the marine food chain. Every piece of discarded netting removed from a beach is one less chance of trapping a helpless animal. By taking responsibility, we can make our beaches safer and our seas cleaner, one piece at a time."

Amy Walker, Community Development Officer from Clean Cornwall, said: “It’s amazing how such a small idea has been picked up by a growing movement of individuals, groups, communities and businesses, all passionate about where they live and working together to make a difference for everyone. Our beaches and coastline are obviously a vital part of Cornwall, but it’s important to also look inland to our towns, villages and countryside. Litter is a hazard for our wildlife and habitats here too and can easily end up in our waterways, adding to marine litter. To all those already doing their bit – a big thank you! To those thinking about it – look out for a beach clean or litter pick station, join in and love your cleaner piece of Cornwall!”

The #2MinuteBeachClean initiative began in Bude in 2014 and there are now more than 250 boards in locations across the UK.

Founder Martin Dorey said Cornwall Council has long supported the #2MinuteBeachClean: "The partnership has been really strong, right from the beginning, as the Council was very supportive in putting our first beach clean boards on beaches in Cornwall and trialling them. This proved that they worked and now we're coming full circle, because we're putting more and more out every day."

Categories: Cornwall

We're supporting the #2MinuteBeachClean

Wed, 07/18/2018 - 15:48

More beachgoers will be able to do their bit for the environment and help rid our coastline of litter after the Council teamed up with Cormac and Clean Cornwall to support the popular #2MinuteBeachClean project.

The three organisations have funded twenty-four #2MinuteBeachClean boards which have now taken up residence at coastal locations from Penzance to Bude, bringing the total number of boards in Cornwall to 44.

Find out more about the #2MinuteBeachClean project and your nearest board

With more people than ever before aware of the impact litter has on the marine environment, the #2MinuteBeachClean boards make it easier for everyone to do their bit.

Each board is lovingly cared for by a 'Board Guardian'. Volunteers from a range of local businesses and organisations including beach cafes, tourist information centres, surf schools and community groups keep the boards stocked with litter pickers and bags or buckets.  The boards are close to litter bins so that those taking part can easily dispose of any rubbish collected.

Last year, a Council survey of beach litter revealed that 10% had been left behind by beach visitors, 60% came from fishing and shipping and 30% had deteriorated to such an extent that its origins could not be identified.

Councillor Sue James, Cabinet portfolio holder for environment and public protection said the survey highlighted the extent of marine and beach debris harms wildlife and damages habitats.

"Of course the best course of action is that people don’t litter in the first place, but the #2MinuteBeachClean provides an opportunity for people to give whatever time they have to help make a difference and show others that litter is not on,” she said. “If lots of people put in a little time it all adds up! While we have contributed towards the cost of the boards, we would not have been able to support this initiative without the help of our wonderful board guardians. This shows that the people of Cornwall really do care about their environment and want to play a part in keeping Cornwall beautiful."    

Ben Pyle, from Cormac, said: “Every contribution helps, which makes the #2minutebeachclean more relevant than ever. Every plastic item properly disposed of is one item less likely to find its way into the marine food chain. Every piece of discarded netting removed from a beach is one less chance of trapping a helpless animal. By taking responsibility, we can make our beaches safer and our seas cleaner, one piece at a time."

Amy Walker, Community Development Officer from Clean Cornwall, said: “It’s amazing how such a small idea has been picked up by a growing movement of individuals, groups, communities and businesses, all passionate about where they live and working together to make a difference for everyone. Our beaches and coastline are obviously a vital part of Cornwall, but it’s important to also look inland to our towns, villages and countryside. Litter is a hazard for our wildlife and habitats here too and can easily end up in our waterways, adding to marine litter. To all those already doing their bit – a big thank you! To those thinking about it – look out for a beach clean or litter pick station, join in and love your cleaner piece of Cornwall!”

The #2MinuteBeachClean initiative began in Bude in 2014 and there are now more than 250 boards in locations across the UK.

Founder Martin Dorey said Cornwall Council has long supported the #2MinuteBeachClean: "The partnership has been really strong, right from the beginning, as the Council was very supportive in putting our first beach clean boards on beaches in Cornwall and trialling them. This proved that they worked and now we're coming full circle, because we're putting more and more out every day."

Categories: Cornwall

Standing by Coverack 12 months on from flash floods

Wed, 07/18/2018 - 10:57

One year on from the flash flood that devastated Coverack, residents are doing what they do best: welcoming summer visitors to the picturesque village and telling their extraordinary story of community resilience.

The village is holding a ‘One Year On from the Flood’ exhibition in St Peter’s Hall on Wednesday (18 July) to show visitors just how far they have come - with the help of emergency services, Cornwall Council, volunteers, the Environment Agency (EA) and others.

The Council has been working with the community to restore Coverack ever since rain, thunder and hail hit the historic fishing village on the afternoon of 18 July 2017. 

The Environment Agency recorded 180mm of rainfall in three hours – three times the monthly average for the whole of July and enough to fill the Royal Albert Hall four times over.

The force of the flood washed away the main road and damaged more than 50 homes and businesses.

In the immediate aftermath, Cornwall Council, Cornwall Fire and Rescue Services, CORMAC, the EA and volunteers from RNAS Culdrose, Team Rubicon and Khalsa Aid were there to help with the evacuation and clean-up, as well as keeping community morale high.

Working round the clock, CORMAC got the main road and carpark, ripped apart by the torrent of floodwater, repaired and reopened in five days – vital for a community reliant on the summer tourist trade.

In the days, weeks and months since, Council and CORMAC services have:

  • cleared 100 tonnes of debris littering the sea front and Polcoverack Lane in 10 days
  • provided 14 days of on-site support from the Localism team, who liaised between villagers and Council services
  • removed and disposed of the fridges, boilers, ovens and other large household goods washed into gardens, lanes and fields
  • repaired North Corner Lane in two months
  • given ongoing advice to residents about how to deal with the damage caused by the flood to their gardens and property
  • completed, over six months, stability investigation work along North Corner Lane
  • reconstructed Polcoverack Lane footpath and bridge and
  • carried out, over 10 months, major reconstruction works after a landslip on the footpath at Sunny Corner.

Cornwall Council Leader Adam Paynter was at the scene of the flood the morning after and committed that the Council would stay until the very end when all work was complete. He said:

“This was a devastating local incident and the whole community, emergency workers, Council and our partner agencies, and volunteers rallied around to help the people of Coverack during a time of need.

“In 12 months we’ve worked hard to support the local community and tackle some complex issues to reconstruct areas. One year on, most of the work is complete and we’re working with residents and businesses to address the last outstanding issues. We have remained true to our word.”

Cllr Julian D Rand MBE, member for St Keverne and Meneage, said:

“For me Coverack was a disaster that had an incredible result. The local community worked tirelessly to support each other and reacted with a true feeling of positivity.

“The wider community - Cornwall Council, Cormac, St Keverne Parish Council and volunteers from across the country - all came together to restore Coverack in an amazingly short time. 

“Of course, there is more to do. The July flood was followed by Storm Emma earlier in 2018 and this damaged the Dolor Carpark, an essential resource for the Village.

“However, the amazing community spirit lives on and Coverack  will remain a Beacon for people working together in the face of challenge.”

The Council expects to complete the following work in the next few months:

  • underpinning the wall of a house at North Corner
  • repairing a bridge on the south west coast path and
  • restoring a footpath at Rosenithon.
Categories: Cornwall

Standing by Coverack 12 months on from flash floods

Wed, 07/18/2018 - 10:57

One year on from the flash flood that devastated Coverack, residents are doing what they do best: welcoming summer visitors to the picturesque village and telling their extraordinary story of community resilience.

The village is holding a ‘One Year On from the Flood’ exhibition in St Peter’s Hall on Wednesday (18 July) to show visitors just how far they have come - with the help of emergency services, Cornwall Council, volunteers, the Environment Agency (EA) and others.

The Council has been working with the community to restore Coverack ever since rain, thunder and hail hit the historic fishing village on the afternoon of 18 July 2017. 

The Environment Agency recorded 180mm of rainfall in three hours – three times the monthly average for the whole of July and enough to fill the Royal Albert Hall four times over.

The force of the flood washed away the main road and damaged more than 50 homes and businesses.

In the immediate aftermath, Cornwall Council, Cornwall Fire and Rescue Services, CORMAC, the EA and volunteers from RNAS Culdrose, Team Rubicon and Khalsa Aid were there to help with the evacuation and clean-up, as well as keeping community morale high.

Working round the clock, CORMAC got the main road and carpark, ripped apart by the torrent of floodwater, repaired and reopened in five days – vital for a community reliant on the summer tourist trade.

In the days, weeks and months since, Council and CORMAC services have:

  • cleared 100 tonnes of debris littering the sea front and Polcoverack Lane in 10 days
  • provided 14 days of on-site support from the Localism team, who liaised between villagers and Council services
  • removed and disposed of the fridges, boilers, ovens and other large household goods washed into gardens, lanes and fields
  • repaired North Corner Lane in two months
  • given ongoing advice to residents about how to deal with the damage caused by the flood to their gardens and property
  • completed, over six months, stability investigation work along North Corner Lane
  • reconstructed Polcoverack Lane footpath and bridge and
  • carried out, over 10 months, major reconstruction works after a landslip on the footpath at Sunny Corner.

Cornwall Council Leader Adam Paynter was at the scene of the flood the morning after and committed that the Council would stay until the very end when all work was complete. He said:

“This was a devastating local incident and the whole community, emergency workers, Council and our partner agencies, and volunteers rallied around to help the people of Coverack during a time of need.

“In 12 months we’ve worked hard to support the local community and tackle some complex issues to reconstruct areas. One year on, most of the work is complete and we’re working with residents and businesses to address the last outstanding issues. We have remained true to our word.”

Cllr Julian D Rand MBE, member for St Keverne and Meneage, said:

“For me Coverack was a disaster that had an incredible result. The local community worked tirelessly to support each other and reacted with a true feeling of positivity.

“The wider community - Cornwall Council, Cormac, St Keverne Parish Council and volunteers from across the country - all came together to restore Coverack in an amazingly short time. 

“Of course, there is more to do. The July flood was followed by Storm Emma earlier in 2018 and this damaged the Dolor Carpark, an essential resource for the Village.

“However, the amazing community spirit lives on and Coverack  will remain a Beacon for people working together in the face of challenge.”

The Council expects to complete the following work in the next few months:

  • underpinning the wall of a house at North Corner
  • repairing a bridge on the south west coast path and
  • restoring a footpath at Rosenithon.
Categories: Cornwall

Portreath keeps its gardens green

Tue, 07/17/2018 - 16:29

Exciting plans to preserve and improve Greenfield Gardens, have been finalised between Cornwall Council and community group Portreath Improvements Committee (PIC).

As part of its management of the gardens the local group will fund the ongoing maintenance and care of the open space. They already look after a number of other open spaces and the car park in Portreath.

 

Edwina Hannaford, Cabinet Member for Neighbourhoods said:

“It’s so important that people feel connected to the place where they live, and the group’s involvement in running this much-love beauty spot is exactly what is needed. This is the sixty-fourth park or play area we’ve successfully transferred to the local community in Cornwall. We recognise that communities have high ambitions to be in control of services in their area. That’s the essence of this double devolution which means a local management approach."

Hugh Malyn, Chairman of Portreath Improvements Committee (PIC)  said:

“Greenfield Gardens in Portreath is a much loved green space for the use of villagers and visitors alike. The PIC, working with the Council, is very happy to be taking on the ownership and management responsibility for the gardens.

The job for us is to maintain and improve the condition of the gardens, by increasing grass cutting & strimming frequencies, further enhancements to the shrubs and trees, and look to update and improve the garden’s furniture. 

In the first week we have replaced the rotten picnic tables with two brand new, high quality wooden tables & seats. Next will be repair or replacement of the benches. 

Longer term we hope to encourage and facilitate more local community events, including village picnics, arts & crafts events, and outdoor theatre performances.“ 

Councillor for Mount Hawke and Portreath, Joyce Duffin, said:

“Greenfield Gardens is a fantastic open space in Portreath. It has been very successfully used for community events such as the Bicentenary of the Tramway, a village picnic to celebrate the Royal Wedding and others.  It is also ideal for playing games such as rounders and great for picnics.  I am thrilled that Greenfield Gardens will be owned and managed locally. The gardens help encourage a healthy, outdoor lifestyle for the village community.”

Posted 17 July

Categories: Cornwall

Portreath keeps its gardens green

Tue, 07/17/2018 - 16:29

Exciting plans to preserve and improve Greenfield Gardens, have been finalised between Cornwall Council and community group Portreath Improvements Committee (PIC).

As part of its management of the gardens the local group will fund the ongoing maintenance and care of the open space. They already look after a number of other open spaces and the car park in Portreath.

 

Edwina Hannaford, Cabinet Member for Neighbourhoods said:

“It’s so important that people feel connected to the place where they live, and the group’s involvement in running this much-love beauty spot is exactly what is needed. This is the sixty-fourth park or play area we’ve successfully transferred to the local community in Cornwall. We recognise that communities have high ambitions to be in control of services in their area. That’s the essence of this double devolution which means a local management approach."

Hugh Malyn, Chairman of Portreath Improvements Committee (PIC)  said:

“Greenfield Gardens in Portreath is a much loved green space for the use of villagers and visitors alike. The PIC, working with the Council, is very happy to be taking on the ownership and management responsibility for the gardens.

The job for us is to maintain and improve the condition of the gardens, by increasing grass cutting & strimming frequencies, further enhancements to the shrubs and trees, and look to update and improve the garden’s furniture. 

In the first week we have replaced the rotten picnic tables with two brand new, high quality wooden tables & seats. Next will be repair or replacement of the benches. 

Longer term we hope to encourage and facilitate more local community events, including village picnics, arts & crafts events, and outdoor theatre performances.“ 

Councillor for Mount Hawke and Portreath, Joyce Duffin, said:

“Greenfield Gardens is a fantastic open space in Portreath. It has been very successfully used for community events such as the Bicentenary of the Tramway, a village picnic to celebrate the Royal Wedding and others.  It is also ideal for playing games such as rounders and great for picnics.  I am thrilled that Greenfield Gardens will be owned and managed locally. The gardens help encourage a healthy, outdoor lifestyle for the village community.”

Posted 17 July

Categories: Cornwall

Sexual health services – local, easy to access and helpful? Your chance to have a say!

Tue, 07/17/2018 - 13:13

Cornwall Council is seeking the views of residents across Cornwall to help shape the future of sexual health services. 

From getting free emergency contraception, to free condoms from the C-Card service, screening at The Hub and even having a coil fitted, a broad range of sexual health services are funded by Cornwall Council’s Wellbeing and Public Health team. Last year over 26,000 patients used specialist sexual health service clinics in Cornwall. 

Later this year, the Council will be recommissioning some of these services, and we’ll use what you tell us to make sure we commission the right services. 

We want to know;

  • Are services open at the right time?
  • Are they in the right place?
  • Are they accessible?
  • How should they develop in the future? 

The services that will be re-commissioned include the open access service at The Hub at Treliske, Young People’s services provided by Brook, and HIV prevention provided by Eddystone Trust and Kernow Positive Support. 

Our online survey is now live and will close on 14 September 2018. Copies of the survey are available in hard copy, large print and easy to read formats. 

Councillor Sally Hawken, Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Wellbeing and Public Health said: “Sexual health is an important part of physical and mental health as well as your emotional and social well-being. It's important to take care of your sexual health. 

We want to make sure residents have access to the best possible services so they can lead long, healthy and happy lives. 

“Most of us will use sexual health services at some point in our lives, whether young or old. This is the opportunity for you to have a say on the services being provided and to make sure the services in the future offer the best choices for you”. 

Denis Cronin, Public Health Consultant for Cornwall Council said: “Sexual health means being able to access appropriate contraception to prevent unplanned pregnancy and being free from sexually transmitted infections. We support people to have the confidence, skills and understanding to take responsibility for their sexual health. It’s really important that we get it right for you, but we need you to tell us what you want so we can make that happen”. 

Have your say by taking our online survey at www.cornwall.gov.uk/sexualhealth . Different formats are available by contacting phdesk@cornwall.gov.uk or calling 01872 323583.

Story posted 17 July

Categories: Cornwall

Sexual health services – local, easy to access and helpful? Your chance to have a say!

Tue, 07/17/2018 - 13:13

Cornwall Council is seeking the views of residents across Cornwall to help shape the future of sexual health services. 

From getting free emergency contraception, to free condoms from the C-Card service, screening at The Hub and even having a coil fitted, a broad range of sexual health services are funded by Cornwall Council’s Wellbeing and Public Health team. Last year over 26,000 patients used specialist sexual health service clinics in Cornwall. 

Later this year, the Council will be recommissioning some of these services, and we’ll use what you tell us to make sure we commission the right services. 

We want to know;

  • Are services open at the right time?
  • Are they in the right place?
  • Are they accessible?
  • How should they develop in the future? 

The services that will be re-commissioned include the open access service at The Hub at Treliske, Young People’s services provided by Brook, and HIV prevention provided by Eddystone Trust and Kernow Positive Support. 

Our online survey is now live and will close on 14 September 2018. Copies of the survey are available in hard copy, large print and easy to read formats. 

Councillor Sally Hawken, Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Wellbeing and Public Health said: “Sexual health is an important part of physical and mental health as well as your emotional and social well-being. It's important to take care of your sexual health. 

We want to make sure residents have access to the best possible services so they can lead long, healthy and happy lives. 

“Most of us will use sexual health services at some point in our lives, whether young or old. This is the opportunity for you to have a say on the services being provided and to make sure the services in the future offer the best choices for you”. 

Denis Cronin, Public Health Consultant for Cornwall Council said: “Sexual health means being able to access appropriate contraception to prevent unplanned pregnancy and being free from sexually transmitted infections. We support people to have the confidence, skills and understanding to take responsibility for their sexual health. It’s really important that we get it right for you, but we need you to tell us what you want so we can make that happen”. 

Have your say by taking our online survey at www.cornwall.gov.uk/sexualhealth . Different formats are available by contacting phdesk@cornwall.gov.uk or calling 01872 323583.

Story posted 17 July

Categories: Cornwall

Satellite launches set to return to British soil following new partnership with Virgin Orbit

Mon, 07/16/2018 - 17:53

The first British satellite launch in 50 years could take place from Cornwall within the next three years following a new partnership with Virgin Orbit.

Virgin Orbit, a satellite launch company, has selected Spaceport Cornwall as an ideal location to operate and deliver one of the first launches of its LauncherOne system outside of its US home.

The last British rocket - Black Arrow - that sent a satellite into space was launched from Australia in 1971. The new partnership deal will make history by pioneering horizontal satellite launches from UK soil.

The news has been welcomed by UK Science Minister Sam Gyimah, who said: “The announcement of a strategic partnership between Virgin Orbit and Cornwall Spaceport is great news for the region and the UK’s ambitions for regular, reliable and responsible access to space. This partnership could see Virgin Orbit’s innovative horizontal launch technology helping the UK’s small satellite industry access space from the convenience of a Spaceport in Cornwall. We will work with both partners to support their ambitions, as we take the next steps in our national spaceflight programme as part of the government’s modern Industrial strategy.”

Virgin Orbit is seeking to provide launches from a Spaceport at Cornwall Airport Newquay by 2021, using a modified Boeing 747-400 aircraft called “Cosmic Girl”. Cosmic Girl will carry a LauncherOne rocket under its wing to a launch range over the Atlantic and release the rocket at around 35,000 feet for onward flight into space, carrying a satellite into Earth orbit.

As a horizontal air-launch platform, LauncherOne enables Virgin Orbit to conduct low cost missions quickly and efficiently by bypassing heavily trafficked established launch ranges. The partnership with Virgin Orbit will help position Cornwall as having the UK’s only horizontal launch facility.

Spaceport Cornwall will provide California-based Virgin Orbit with a strategic Western European location and make a major contribution to the Cornwall’s ambition to create a £1 billion space economy as part of its response the UK Industrial Strategy.

Britain is a world-leader in the production of small satellites, supporting more than £250 billion of GDP in the wider economy, but lacks any means to get them into space. The fast-growing global satellite launch market is predicted to be worth around £10 billion over the next decade. It is estimated that up to 2,600 microsatellites (under 50kg) will require launch over the next five years alone.

Virgin Orbit will today (16 July 2018) sign the partnering agreement with Cornwall Council at Farnborough International Airshow.  Work will now commence to develop a detailed plan for launch by 2021 as well as a Spaceport and Operator Licence application.

The signing of this agreement is the culmination of over a year’s work by a team led and funded by the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP), in partnership with Cornwall Council.

Following Virgin Orbit’s commitment, Cornwall Council will consider resources to progress the project at a meeting of its Cabinet on a date to be confirmed.

Spaceport Cornwall could eventually create 480 jobs and contribute £25 million a year to the local economy. The LEP’s Space Action Plan predicts that the wider space sector could create thousands more jobs in Cornwall and by 2030 be worth £1 billion a year.

Patrick McCall, Managing Director Virgin Group and Chairman of Virgin Orbit’s Board of Directors, said:  “Cornwall can deliver new launch capabilities for the UK quickly and efficiently by upgrading Cornwall Airport Newquay to support our horizontal air-launch platform. The Cornwall partnership allows us to grasp important market share, gain instant global launch market credibility and, with the technology already being tested in the US, further lower our risk.”

Cornwall Council leader, Adam Paynter, said: “This is a game-changing partnership that will inspire a generation and create a new industry in Cornwall. The challenge now is to make the most of this hard-won opportunity so that it can deliver on its enormous potential not just for Cornwall but for the UK as a whole. We look forward to welcoming Virgin Orbit to Cornwall and working with HM Government to realise the potential.”

Mark Duddridge, Chair of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP, said: “Cornwall can play a key role supporting the UK Government’s Industrial Strategy ambitions and we have identified space as a major opportunity for growth.  The partnership with Virgin Orbit is a clear statement that Cornwall is the best UK location for horizontal launch and opens the door to a global satellite customer base.  We will work with Government to maximise UK investment and jobs and make the most of the unique environment at Spaceport Cornwall. With our clear uncongested airspace and access to launch sites over the sea, it will be a vital part of a global UK offer and we look forward to working with other UK vertical launch locations to promote trade and investment.”

The UK Government has a target of achieving commercial spaceflight from British soil from the end of the decade, as well as increasing the UK’s share of the global space economy from 6.5% now to 10% by 2030, which would be worth an estimated £40 billion per annum.

The UK’s space sector has estimated annual revenues of £13.7 billion and employs 38,500 people. It has been growing at 8% a year over the last decade, four times as fast as the rest of the UK economy.   

Cornwall Airport Newquay, which is owned by Cornwall Council, was first unveiled as one of the UK’s potential Spaceport locations in July 2014 because of its long runway, uncongested airspace and direct access to the Atlantic Ocean.

Cornwall is already home to Goonhilly Earth Station, famous as the world’s largest satellite earth receiving station. Goonhilly is being upgraded through an £8.4m LEP-funded contract with the European Space Agency, announced in February, to become part of the deep space network, and recently secured a £24 million investment from UK billionaire Peter Hargreaves.

 

Story posted 16 July 2018

Categories: Cornwall

Satellite launches set to return to British soil following new partnership with Virgin Orbit

Mon, 07/16/2018 - 17:53

The first British satellite launch in 50 years could take place from Cornwall within the next three years following a new partnership with Virgin Orbit.

Virgin Orbit, a satellite launch company, has selected Spaceport Cornwall as an ideal location to operate and deliver one of the first launches of its LauncherOne system outside of its US home.

The last British rocket - Black Arrow - that sent a satellite into space was launched from Australia in 1971. The new partnership deal will make history by pioneering horizontal satellite launches from UK soil.

The news has been welcomed by UK Science Minister Sam Gyimah, who said: “The announcement of a strategic partnership between Virgin Orbit and Cornwall Spaceport is great news for the region and the UK’s ambitions for regular, reliable and responsible access to space. This partnership could see Virgin Orbit’s innovative horizontal launch technology helping the UK’s small satellite industry access space from the convenience of a Spaceport in Cornwall. We will work with both partners to support their ambitions, as we take the next steps in our national spaceflight programme as part of the government’s modern Industrial strategy.”

Virgin Orbit is seeking to provide launches from a Spaceport at Cornwall Airport Newquay by 2021, using a modified Boeing 747-400 aircraft called “Cosmic Girl”. Cosmic Girl will carry a LauncherOne rocket under its wing to a launch range over the Atlantic and release the rocket at around 35,000 feet for onward flight into space, carrying a satellite into Earth orbit.

As a horizontal air-launch platform, LauncherOne enables Virgin Orbit to conduct low cost missions quickly and efficiently by bypassing heavily trafficked established launch ranges. The partnership with Virgin Orbit will help position Cornwall as having the UK’s only horizontal launch facility.

Spaceport Cornwall will provide California-based Virgin Orbit with a strategic Western European location and make a major contribution to the Cornwall’s ambition to create a £1 billion space economy as part of its response the UK Industrial Strategy.

Britain is a world-leader in the production of small satellites, supporting more than £250 billion of GDP in the wider economy, but lacks any means to get them into space. The fast-growing global satellite launch market is predicted to be worth around £10 billion over the next decade. It is estimated that up to 2,600 microsatellites (under 50kg) will require launch over the next five years alone.

Virgin Orbit will today (16 July 2018) sign the partnering agreement with Cornwall Council at Farnborough International Airshow.  Work will now commence to develop a detailed plan for launch by 2021 as well as a Spaceport and Operator Licence application.

The signing of this agreement is the culmination of over a year’s work by a team led and funded by the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP), in partnership with Cornwall Council.

Following Virgin Orbit’s commitment, Cornwall Council will consider resources to progress the project at a meeting of its Cabinet on a date to be confirmed.

Spaceport Cornwall could eventually create 480 jobs and contribute £25 million a year to the local economy. The LEP’s Space Action Plan predicts that the wider space sector could create thousands more jobs in Cornwall and by 2030 be worth £1 billion a year.

Patrick McCall, Managing Director Virgin Group and Chairman of Virgin Orbit’s Board of Directors, said:  “Cornwall can deliver new launch capabilities for the UK quickly and efficiently by upgrading Cornwall Airport Newquay to support our horizontal air-launch platform. The Cornwall partnership allows us to grasp important market share, gain instant global launch market credibility and, with the technology already being tested in the US, further lower our risk.”

Cornwall Council leader, Adam Paynter, said: “This is a game-changing partnership that will inspire a generation and create a new industry in Cornwall. The challenge now is to make the most of this hard-won opportunity so that it can deliver on its enormous potential not just for Cornwall but for the UK as a whole. We look forward to welcoming Virgin Orbit to Cornwall and working with HM Government to realise the potential.”

Mark Duddridge, Chair of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP, said: “Cornwall can play a key role supporting the UK Government’s Industrial Strategy ambitions and we have identified space as a major opportunity for growth.  The partnership with Virgin Orbit is a clear statement that Cornwall is the best UK location for horizontal launch and opens the door to a global satellite customer base.  We will work with Government to maximise UK investment and jobs and make the most of the unique environment at Spaceport Cornwall. With our clear uncongested airspace and access to launch sites over the sea, it will be a vital part of a global UK offer and we look forward to working with other UK vertical launch locations to promote trade and investment.”

The UK Government has a target of achieving commercial spaceflight from British soil from the end of the decade, as well as increasing the UK’s share of the global space economy from 6.5% now to 10% by 2030, which would be worth an estimated £40 billion per annum.

The UK’s space sector has estimated annual revenues of £13.7 billion and employs 38,500 people. It has been growing at 8% a year over the last decade, four times as fast as the rest of the UK economy.   

Cornwall Airport Newquay, which is owned by Cornwall Council, was first unveiled as one of the UK’s potential Spaceport locations in July 2014 because of its long runway, uncongested airspace and direct access to the Atlantic Ocean.

Cornwall is already home to Goonhilly Earth Station, famous as the world’s largest satellite earth receiving station. Goonhilly is being upgraded through an £8.4m LEP-funded contract with the European Space Agency, announced in February, to become part of the deep space network, and recently secured a £24 million investment from UK billionaire Peter Hargreaves.

 

Story posted 16 July 2018

Categories: Cornwall

Borrowing books from Cornwall’s libraries has never been simpler

Mon, 07/16/2018 - 15:31

Borrowing books has never been easier – in fact, you don’t even need to leave your sofa these days.

More than 60,000 free books have been downloaded from Cornwall’s libraries in the past year, all thanks to BorrowBox.

The download service works across nearly all digital platforms, and is free to use if you are a member of Cornwall’s library service.

You can download audiobooks or ebooks, and they will be deleted automatically at the end of the loan period – so there is no danger of any late return charges.

Since its launch in 2014, more than 5,000 people have registered for the service, with numbers continuing to grow all of the time.

Councillor Edwina Hannaford, Cornwall Council Portfolio holder for Neighbourhoods, said:  “Our library service is continuing to evolve and to offer more and more for our local communities.

“Being able to borrow audiobooks or ebooks at the click of a button makes accessing our service easier than ever before.

“It is great so many people are already taking advantage of this technology, and I am sure we will only see the numbers continue to grow in the future.”

You can even use the technology to take part in the Summer Reading Challenge 2018, which is being run in conjunction with the Beano comic, which celebrates its 80th birthday this year. 

The annual event is designed to prevent children aged between 4 and 11 from experiencing a dip in their reading skills during the six-week break from school.

To take part, all children need to do is to visit their local library and sign up for the challenge – they will then be able to use BorrowBox to download books to read for the challenge.They can then collect their rewards from the library whenever they visit. For those who prefer print, our library shelves are filled with exciting books ready for this year’s Challenge.

You can register to take part in the Summer Reading Challenge at all of our branch libraries and also at all of our mobile library stops. In addition, we have volunteers trained to run the Challenge at Devoran, Millbrook and St Dennis micro libraries, who are all looking forward to being involved this year.

Posted on 16 July

Categories: Cornwall

Borrowing books from Cornwall’s libraries has never been simpler

Mon, 07/16/2018 - 15:31

Borrowing books has never been easier – in fact, you don’t even need to leave your sofa these days.

More than 60,000 free books have been downloaded from Cornwall’s libraries in the past year, all thanks to BorrowBox.

The download service works across nearly all digital platforms, and is free to use if you are a member of Cornwall’s library service.

You can download audiobooks or ebooks, and they will be deleted automatically at the end of the loan period – so there is no danger of any late return charges.

Since its launch in 2014, more than 5,000 people have registered for the service, with numbers continuing to grow all of the time.

Councillor Edwina Hannaford, Cornwall Council Portfolio holder for Neighbourhoods, said:  “Our library service is continuing to evolve and to offer more and more for our local communities.

“Being able to borrow audiobooks or ebooks at the click of a button makes accessing our service easier than ever before.

“It is great so many people are already taking advantage of this technology, and I am sure we will only see the numbers continue to grow in the future.”

You can even use the technology to take part in the Summer Reading Challenge 2018, which is being run in conjunction with the Beano comic, which celebrates its 80th birthday this year. 

The annual event is designed to prevent children aged between 4 and 11 from experiencing a dip in their reading skills during the six-week break from school.

To take part, all children need to do is to visit their local library and sign up for the challenge – they will then be able to use BorrowBox to download books to read for the challenge.They can then collect their rewards from the library whenever they visit. For those who prefer print, our library shelves are filled with exciting books ready for this year’s Challenge.

You can register to take part in the Summer Reading Challenge at all of our branch libraries and also at all of our mobile library stops. In addition, we have volunteers trained to run the Challenge at Devoran, Millbrook and St Dennis micro libraries, who are all looking forward to being involved this year.

Posted on 16 July

Categories: Cornwall

Satellite launches set to return to British soil after 50 years following new partnership with Virgin Orbit in Cornwall

Mon, 07/16/2018 - 00:10

 

The first British satellite launch in 50 years could take place from Cornwall within the next three years following a new partnership with Virgin Orbit.

Virgin Orbit, a satellite launch company, has selected Spaceport Cornwall as an ideal location to operate and deliver one of the first launches of its LauncherOne system outside of its US home.

The last British rocket - Black Arrow - that sent a satellite into space was launched from Australia in 1971. The new partnership deal will make history by pioneering horizontal satellite launches from UK soil.

The news has been welcomed by UK Science Minister Sam Gyimah, who said: “The announcement of a strategic partnership between Virgin Orbit and Cornwall Spaceport is great news for the region and the UK’s ambitions for regular, reliable and responsible access to space. This partnership could see Virgin Orbit’s innovative horizontal launch technology helping the UK’s small satellite industry access space from the convenience of a Spaceport in Cornwall. We will work with both partners to support their ambitions, as we take the next steps in our national spaceflight programme as part of the government’s modern Industrial strategy.”

Virgin Orbit is seeking to provide launches from a Spaceport at Cornwall Airport Newquay by 2021, using a modified Boeing 747-400 aircraft called “Cosmic Girl”. Cosmic Girl will carry a LauncherOne rocket under its wing to a launch range over the Atlantic and release the rocket at around 35,000 feet for onward flight into space, carrying a satellite into Earth orbit.

As a horizontal air-launch platform, LauncherOne enables Virgin Orbit to conduct low cost missions quickly and efficiently by bypassing heavily trafficked established launch ranges. The partnership with Virgin Orbit will help position Cornwall as having the UK’s only horizontal launch facility.

Spaceport Cornwall will provide California-based Virgin Orbit with a strategic Western European location and make a major contribution to the Cornwall’s ambition to create a £1 billion space economy as part of its response the UK Industrial Strategy.

Britain is a world-leader in the production of small satellites, supporting more than £250 billion of GDP in the wider economy, but lacks any means to get them into space. The fast-growing global satellite launch market is predicted to be worth around £10 billion over the next decade. It is estimated that up to 2,600 microsatellites (under 50kg) will require launch over the next five years alone.

Virgin Orbit will today (16 July 2018) sign the partnering agreement with Cornwall Council at Farnborough International Airshow.  Work will now commence to develop a detailed plan for launch by 2021 as well as a Spaceport and Operator Licence application.

The signing of this agreement is the culmination of over a year’s work by a team led and funded by the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP), in partnership with Cornwall Council.

Following Virgin Orbit’s commitment, Cornwall Council will consider resources to progress the project at a meeting of its Cabinet on a date to be confirmed.

Spaceport Cornwall could eventually create 480 jobs and contribute £25 million a year to the local economy. The LEP’s Space Action Plan predicts that the wider space sector could create thousands more jobs in Cornwall and by 2030 be worth £1 billion a year.

Patrick McCall, Managing Director Virgin Group and Chairman of Virgin Orbit’s Board of Directors, said:  “Cornwall can deliver new launch capabilities for the UK quickly and efficiently by upgrading Cornwall Airport Newquay to support our horizontal air-launch platform. The Cornwall partnership allows us to grasp important market share, gain instant global launch market credibility and, with the technology already being tested in the US, further lower our risk.”

Cornwall Council leader, Adam Paynter, said: “This is a game-changing partnership that will inspire a generation and create a new industry in Cornwall. The challenge now is to make the most of this hard-won opportunity so that it can deliver on its enormous potential not just for Cornwall but for the UK as a whole. We look forward to welcoming Virgin Orbit to Cornwall and working with HM Government to realise the potential.”

Mark Duddridge, Chair of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP, said: “Cornwall can play a key role supporting the UK Government’s Industrial Strategy ambitions and we have identified space as a major opportunity for growth.  The partnership with Virgin Orbit is a clear statement that Cornwall is the best UK location for horizontal launch and opens the door to a global satellite customer base.  We will work with Government to maximise UK investment and jobs and make the most of the unique environment at Spaceport Cornwall. With our clear uncongested airspace and access to launch sites over the sea, it will be a vital part of a global UK offer and we look forward to working with other UK vertical launch locations to promote trade and investment.”

The UK Government has a target of achieving commercial spaceflight from British soil from the end of the decade, as well as increasing the UK’s share of the global space economy from 6.5% now to 10% by 2030, which would be worth an estimated £40 billion per annum.

The UK’s space sector has estimated annual revenues of £13.7 billion and employs 38,500 people. It has been growing at 8% a year over the last decade, four times as fast as the rest of the UK economy.   

Cornwall Airport Newquay, which is owned by Cornwall Council, was first unveiled as one of the UK’s potential Spaceport locations in July 2014 because of its long runway, uncongested airspace and direct access to the Atlantic Ocean.

Cornwall is already home to Goonhilly Earth Station, famous as the world’s largest satellite earth receiving station. Goonhilly is being upgraded through an £8.4m LEP-funded contract with the European Space Agency, announced in February, to become part of the deep space network, and recently secured a £24 million investment from UK billionaire Peter Hargreaves.

 

Story posted 16 July 2018

Categories: Cornwall

Devolution in action shows how place making in Cornwall is shaping the future

Fri, 07/13/2018 - 19:30

Putting power as close to the community as possible was a key theme during a visit by the Secretary of State for Communities the Rt Hon James Brokenshire MP.

Cornwall is the first and only non-metropolitan area to strike a devolution deal with Government, signed in 2015. On the third anniversary of the deal, Mr Brokenshire saw first-hand how powers and funding devolved from Government to Cornwall are helping improve the lives of local people. He met Cornish residents who have benefited from support to grow their businesses and make their homes cheaper to heat under devolution.

Ultra-localism is a central plank of Mr Brokenshire’s vision for communities. He visited Cornwall to see how Cornwall Council is using the powers devolved from Government – and also devolving power from the Council to local people, under an approach called ‘double devolution’. The Secretary of State met local voluntary groups, town and parish councillors at Par Running Track and St Austell to hear from them how local people are benefiting from the Council’s approach to putting community facilities and services back under local control. The Secretary of State also learnt about the 40 new buses, all equipped with wi-fi and contactless payment, which Cornwall Council has secured using its devolved bus franchising powers.

Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly has a bold and ambitious plan called New Frontiers, which seeks further devolution from Government to help our economy and society flourish beyond Brexit.

Mr Brokenshire met members of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Leadershp Board to discuss its New Frontiers plan to position Cornwall post-Brexit as a growing economy in global industries such renewable energy, creative and digital technologies, space technology and lithium mining, while safeguarding traditional industries such as agriculture and fishing. New Frontiers would create 28,000 jobs and increase Cornwall’s contribution to the national economy by £2 billion.

Secretary of State for Communities, Rt Hon James Brokenshire MP said:

“This Government announced a devolution deal for Cornwall three years ago – the first of its kind in England. It heralded the start of a new age of localism, giving people ownership of the places they live.

“I’m delighted to see this deal in action – from the state-of-the-art buses, to the Par Running Track. Through being locally controlled, these have become huge community assets and I congratulate everyone involved for making them such a success.

“Giving power and money back from Whitehall builds stronger communities and devolution will continue to play a large part of ensuring our country’s future success as we build a Britain fit for the future.”

Leader of Cornwall Council and Chair of the Leadership Board for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly Adam Paynter said: “Cornwall is living proof that when power and control is devolved to communities, we can deliver better outcomes for people.

“Cornwall Council’s commitment to ‘double devolution’ means we are not just winning devolved powers from Government to Cornwall, but giving powers from the Council to local communities. We are putting hundreds of community assets and services back under local control, working with Cornwall’s fantastic voluntary groups, and town and parish councils.

“The powers Government devolved to Cornwall are enabling the Council and partners to make a real difference to people’s lives – levering in millions of pounds of extra investment to secure a new fleet of buses, make the homes of thousands of vulnerable households cheaper to heat, and support thousands of local businesses to start up and grow on.

“Our New Frontiers plan proposes even more ambitious plans for Cornwall. We believe that the more powers we have in Cornwall, the more we can, collectively, do for Cornwall – making it a better place to live, work and run a business.”

Chair of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP Mark Duddridge said:

“Cornwall’s devolution deal with Government is making a real difference to our region, supporting business growth and the development of our distinctive strengths in sectors such as renewable energy. Building on this strong track record, I hope Government will support our New Frontiers plan which includes piloting a Local Industrial Strategy to unleash the potential of our space and satellite, creative and digital, and other sector strengths to grow Cornwall and the national economy.”

During the visit Mr Brokenshire praised the achievements of the Par Running Track community group. In April 2018, Cornwall Council transferred the management of the running track, football pitches and changing facilities to Par Track Ltd – a Community Benefit Society including local residents and track users. Progress is also underway to further transfer the adjacent skate park for both sites to be run as a single entity.

He also commemorated the achievements of St Austell Town Council. Cornwall Council has worked closely with St Austell on a phased ‘total place’ devolution package for multiple town assets and services – driven by the belief that St Austell is their best long-term custodian and most able to shape services to meet local need.

Beginning in 2016 with the transfer of responsibility for allotments and public conveniences, the town has subsequently taken control of over 20 community sites and services – including 39 areas of public open spaces and play areas, and a major agency agreement that includes responsibility to undertake grounds maintenance and other works for sites such as open and closed churchyards and highways. The most recent phase has also seen transfer of the library, community buildings and two car parks.

During the visit the Secretary of State was briefed on Cornwall Councils’ focus on localism and double devolution, which is giving local communities more influence on say on how money is spent and used in their area, with over 300 initiatives in train from keeping libraries and parks open and running tracks like the one in Par in full use.

This included delivery of key projects under Cornwall’’s first devolution deal:

  • Improvements to Cornwall’s public transport system such as using bus franchising powers devolved from Whitehall to lever £17 million of private investment into the Cornish bus network, delivering contactless payment, smart ticketing, a new 41-strong bus fleet and new mainline railway stock.
  • How the Council secured £7.5 million private investment for the region’s Warm and Well programme, making the homes of 1,300 vulnerable households in Cornwall cheaper to heat every year.
  • Investment in new energy technologies such as deep geothermal energy that could provide - along with marine renewable energy - electricity for thousands of homes, which would see the region become a major energy producing area of the country.
  • The launch of a £40million Business Investment Fund with partners like the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP, which will be used to accelerate the growth of local small and medium sized businesses in Cornwall, providing them with loan funding from £25k to £2m.

Story posted 13 July 2018 

Categories: Cornwall

Devolution in action shows how place making in Cornwall is shaping the future

Fri, 07/13/2018 - 19:30

Putting power as close to the community as possible was a key theme during a visit by the Secretary of State for Communities the Rt Hon James Brokenshire MP.

Cornwall is the first and only non-metropolitan area to strike a devolution deal with Government, signed in 2015. On the third anniversary of the deal, Mr Brokenshire saw first-hand how powers and funding devolved from Government to Cornwall are helping improve the lives of local people. He met Cornish residents who have benefited from support to grow their businesses and make their homes cheaper to heat under devolution.

Ultra-localism is a central plank of Mr Brokenshire’s vision for communities. He visited Cornwall to see how Cornwall Council is using the powers devolved from Government – and also devolving power from the Council to local people, under an approach called ‘double devolution’. The Secretary of State met local voluntary groups, town and parish councillors at Par Running Track and St Austell to hear from them how local people are benefiting from the Council’s approach to putting community facilities and services back under local control. The Secretary of State also learnt about the 40 new buses, all equipped with wi-fi and contactless payment, which Cornwall Council has secured using its devolved bus franchising powers.

Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly has a bold and ambitious plan called New Frontiers, which seeks further devolution from Government to help our economy and society flourish beyond Brexit.

Mr Brokenshire met members of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Leadershp Board to discuss its New Frontiers plan to position Cornwall post-Brexit as a growing economy in global industries such renewable energy, creative and digital technologies, space technology and lithium mining, while safeguarding traditional industries such as agriculture and fishing. New Frontiers would create 28,000 jobs and increase Cornwall’s contribution to the national economy by £2 billion.

Secretary of State for Communities, Rt Hon James Brokenshire MP said:

“This Government announced a devolution deal for Cornwall three years ago – the first of its kind in England. It heralded the start of a new age of localism, giving people ownership of the places they live.

“I’m delighted to see this deal in action – from the state-of-the-art buses, to the Par Running Track. Through being locally controlled, these have become huge community assets and I congratulate everyone involved for making them such a success.

“Giving power and money back from Whitehall builds stronger communities and devolution will continue to play a large part of ensuring our country’s future success as we build a Britain fit for the future.”

Leader of Cornwall Council and Chair of the Leadership Board for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly Adam Paynter said: “Cornwall is living proof that when power and control is devolved to communities, we can deliver better outcomes for people.

“Cornwall Council’s commitment to ‘double devolution’ means we are not just winning devolved powers from Government to Cornwall, but giving powers from the Council to local communities. We are putting hundreds of community assets and services back under local control, working with Cornwall’s fantastic voluntary groups, and town and parish councils.

“The powers Government devolved to Cornwall are enabling the Council and partners to make a real difference to people’s lives – levering in millions of pounds of extra investment to secure a new fleet of buses, make the homes of thousands of vulnerable households cheaper to heat, and support thousands of local businesses to start up and grow on.

“Our New Frontiers plan proposes even more ambitious plans for Cornwall. We believe that the more powers we have in Cornwall, the more we can, collectively, do for Cornwall – making it a better place to live, work and run a business.”

Chair of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP Mark Duddridge said:

“Cornwall’s devolution deal with Government is making a real difference to our region, supporting business growth and the development of our distinctive strengths in sectors such as renewable energy. Building on this strong track record, I hope Government will support our New Frontiers plan which includes piloting a Local Industrial Strategy to unleash the potential of our space and satellite, creative and digital, and other sector strengths to grow Cornwall and the national economy.”

During the visit Mr Brokenshire praised the achievements of the Par Running Track community group. In April 2018, Cornwall Council transferred the management of the running track, football pitches and changing facilities to Par Track Ltd – a Community Benefit Society including local residents and track users. Progress is also underway to further transfer the adjacent skate park for both sites to be run as a single entity.

He also commemorated the achievements of St Austell Town Council. Cornwall Council has worked closely with St Austell on a phased ‘total place’ devolution package for multiple town assets and services – driven by the belief that St Austell is their best long-term custodian and most able to shape services to meet local need.

Beginning in 2016 with the transfer of responsibility for allotments and public conveniences, the town has subsequently taken control of over 20 community sites and services – including 39 areas of public open spaces and play areas, and a major agency agreement that includes responsibility to undertake grounds maintenance and other works for sites such as open and closed churchyards and highways. The most recent phase has also seen transfer of the library, community buildings and two car parks.

During the visit the Secretary of State was briefed on Cornwall Councils’ focus on localism and double devolution, which is giving local communities more influence on say on how money is spent and used in their area, with over 300 initiatives in train from keeping libraries and parks open and running tracks like the one in Par in full use.

This included delivery of key projects under Cornwall’’s first devolution deal:

  • Improvements to Cornwall’s public transport system such as using bus franchising powers devolved from Whitehall to lever £17 million of private investment into the Cornish bus network, delivering contactless payment, smart ticketing, a new 41-strong bus fleet and new mainline railway stock.
  • How the Council secured £7.5 million private investment for the region’s Warm and Well programme, making the homes of 1,300 vulnerable households in Cornwall cheaper to heat every year.
  • Investment in new energy technologies such as deep geothermal energy that could provide - along with marine renewable energy - electricity for thousands of homes, which would see the region become a major energy producing area of the country.
  • The launch of a £40million Business Investment Fund with partners like the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP, which will be used to accelerate the growth of local small and medium sized businesses in Cornwall, providing them with loan funding from £25k to £2m.

Story posted 13 July 2018 

Categories: Cornwall

Have your say on Porthtowan traffic and parking

Fri, 07/13/2018 - 16:41

People in Porthtowan are being asked to share their views on the village’s traffic and parking arrangements at a public engagement session in the Boardroom of The Blue Bar from 3-7pm on Thursday 19 July.

CORMAC and Cornwall Council highways officers will be on hand to listen to the public’s ideas to improve the parking situation on Beach Road, West Beach Road and Sandy Road.  The range of ideas for improvements could include a 20mph speed limit in the village, moving the bus stop to a new location opposite the village hall, extending the existing restricted parking zone months to match those in the car park, short-term parking opportunities throughout the village or removing the height barrier from the main car park.

Any future schemes that may emerge as village priorities from the engagement session will be subject to funding availability and competition against other Cornwall Council priority schemes.

There is also an online questionnaire for those who are unable to attend the engagement session.  The questionnaire will be available until 14 September and the results will be published on the Cornwall Council and St Agnes Parish Council websites in mid-November.

Joyce Duffin, Cornwall Councillor for Mount Hawke and Portreath, said: “The public engagement session is the first step towards improving traffic management in the village.  Come and tell us what you think would be the best improvements to the village to make it better.  We’ll use your comments and feedback to shape a formal consultation on the best options for Porthtowan, and this will put us in a better position to seek funding for changes local people would like to see.”

Story posted 13 July 2018

Categories: Cornwall

Have your say on Porthtowan traffic and parking

Fri, 07/13/2018 - 16:41

People in Porthtowan are being asked to share their views on the village’s traffic and parking arrangements at a public engagement session in the Boardroom of The Blue Bar from 3-7pm on Thursday 19 July.

CORMAC and Cornwall Council highways officers will be on hand to listen to the public’s ideas to improve the parking situation on Beach Road, West Beach Road and Sandy Road.  The range of ideas for improvements could include a 20mph speed limit in the village, moving the bus stop to a new location opposite the village hall, extending the existing restricted parking zone months to match those in the car park, short-term parking opportunities throughout the village or removing the height barrier from the main car park.

Any future schemes that may emerge as village priorities from the engagement session will be subject to funding availability and competition against other Cornwall Council priority schemes.

There is also an online questionnaire for those who are unable to attend the engagement session.  The questionnaire will be available until 14 September and the results will be published on the Cornwall Council and St Agnes Parish Council websites in mid-November.

Joyce Duffin, Cornwall Councillor for Mount Hawke and Portreath, said: “The public engagement session is the first step towards improving traffic management in the village.  Come and tell us what you think would be the best improvements to the village to make it better.  We’ll use your comments and feedback to shape a formal consultation on the best options for Porthtowan, and this will put us in a better position to seek funding for changes local people would like to see.”

Story posted 13 July 2018

Categories: Cornwall

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