Dorset

Spot the signs of county lines this summer

Dorset For You - Fri, 07/19/2019 - 09:57

Dorset authorities are asking residents to look out for signs of county lines and help protect young people from being exploited by criminals this summer.

Dorset Police, NHS Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group, Public Health Dorset, the Youth Offending Service and Dorset Council are working together to tackle child exploitation, including county lines – which involves drug dealing networks using children to connect urban and rural areas across the UK.

And, with the summer holidays almost upon us, residents are being asked to keep an eye out and report any concerns.

Some of the signs of exploitation and county lines involvement are:

• A child or young person going missing from home or significant changes in emotional well-being
• A person meeting unfamiliar adults or a change to their behaviour
• The use of drugs and alcohol
• Acquiring money or expensive gifts they can’t account for
• Lone children from outside of the area
• Individuals with multiple mobile phones, tablets or ‘SIM cards’
• Young people with more money, expensive clothing, or accessories than they can account for
• Unknown or suspicious looking characters coming and going from a neighbour’s house
• Relationships with controlling or older individuals or associations with gangs
• Suspicion of self-harm, physical assault or unexplained injuries

Superintendent Caroline Naughton from Dorset Police said:

“Keeping our communities safe from county lines is a priority for Dorset Police throughout the year – but it can be particularly challenging during the summer months due to the sheer numbers of people visiting our county during the holiday season. Dorset remains one of the safest places in the country to live, work and visit and we are asking the public to help us to keep it that way. If they spot any of the signs of county lines, then we ask them to let us know by calling 101 or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.”

Agencies in Dorset have been working together to improve the way intelligence is collected, shared and acted upon to tackle child exploitation. A multi-agency steering group has been set up to strengthen partnership working and protect vulnerable children and young people.

Sarah Parker, Executive Director for Children at Dorset Council, chairs the steering group. She said:

“County lines can have a devastating impact on children and families’ lives, so we need to all stand together to try and stop it. It’s really important that people know what to look out for and who to contact, so agencies can act and protect children and young people from being exploited. We need our communities to be our eyes and ears and report any concerns.”

If a child or young person is showing signs of mistreatment, seems to be travelling long distances or is unfamiliar with an area, the best advice is to trust your instincts and report your suspicions to the police online or by calling 101. Alternatively, you can call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

Find out more information about county lines.

Ends

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Categories: Dorset

Dorset Road Fix – August sites

Dorset For You - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 12:11

Dorset Highways maintenance gangs are out across the county continuing to repair road damage.

Due to the large equipment used, the area of the road being worked on will be closed. Daytime road closures are 9am to 4pm and night work is usually from 7pm to 6am.

In August we will be repairing sections along the following roads:

B3091 High Street, Shaftesbury
24-hour closure, 22 July to 2 August (drainage work)

Blandford Bridge (West Street)
two-way signals 22 July to 30 August (bridge maintenance)

A350, Steepleton Bends to Iwerne Minster
daytime closure 29 July to 13 August

Queens Avenue, Dorchester
daytime closure, 31 July & 1 August

Monmouth Road/Barnes Way, Dorchester
daytime closure, 1 & 2 August

St Mary’s Gardens, Beaminster
daytime closure, 5 August

East Stour Crossroads (safety scheme)
12 to 14 August
daytime closure on Scotchey Hill
three-way lights at A30/B3092 crossroads

Church Lane, Tarrant Rushton
daytime closure, 14 & 15 August

B3390, Affpuddle Heath
daytime closure, 20 August to 23 August

Bats Lane, Martinstown
daytime closure, 29 & 30 August

All scheduled roadworks, including utilities, can be found on the online roadworks map.

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Categories: Dorset

Schools recognised for improving student performance

Dorset For You - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 11:09

Two schools in East Dorset have been recognised for their work in raising the achievement of students as a result of pupil premium funding.

Wimborne First School has won the primary school category and Cranborne Middle School has won the secondary school category in the Dorset Pupil Premium Awards run by Dorset Council. The winning schools were recognised as having done the most to improve student opportunities and achievements.

The pupil premium grant is additional funding for publicly funded schools in England and provides schools with extra resources to help support disadvantaged children.

Wimborne First School were recognised for offering an individualised approach with a focus on high quality teaching for all pupils and high expectations that children will do well. The school has greatly improved attendance by introducing mindfulness and yoga and also offer wide range of extra-curricular activities such as STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) clubs.

Cranborne Middle School focuses on supporting a good transition into Year 5, strong parent partnership and good networks with other schools to share good practice. The school also focuses on quality teaching for all children and on raising attendance.

Sarah Hartley, Headteacher at Wimborne First School said, “We are very proud to receive this award. We pride ourselves in giving every child in our school a chance to thrive and succeed.  We have an extremely creative staff who, through a variety of interventions such as ‘Mindful Movement’ and ‘Wellies and Waterproofs’, give the children the chance to aspire to be the best they can!

Our aim is to give the children strategies to be in a positive place, ready to learn and be aware of their mindfulness, this in turn raises attainment and attendance in the school.”

Laura Trepess, Year 5 Teacher and Lead Officer for Pupil Premium at Cranborne Middle School said, “Myself and all the staff are thrilled to have won this award. It is testament to the hard work and dedication of the whole staff and governors of our school, putting pupil premium at the heart of everything we do.

“We have had to be innovative in the way we have used our funding, which has involved getting to know our pupils really well, collaborating with other schools, researching and trialling new interventions which are robustly monitored and assessed; and ultimately, continually striving to give our disadvantaged pupils a better chance in life.”

Cllr Andrew Parry, Dorset Council Cabinet Member for Children, Education and Early Help, said:

“There is some great work happening in schools across Dorset to ensure all pupils are given the same opportunities to achieve as well as their peers.

“These awards allow us to recognise just some of this work and, in turn, provide greater opportunity for schools and early years settings to showcase their achievements and share best practice. Thank you to everyone who entered and congratulations to the winners.”

Prizes for both schools including training vouchers, free places on a team building day and free music instrument hire for 10 pupils.

Schools and early years settings interested in finding out more about the Dorset Pupil Premium awards or in sharing pupil premium best practice can contact s.peel@dorsetcouncil.gov.uk for more information.

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Categories: Dorset

Update from our patrols

Dorset For You - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 10:55

Patrol officers in Weymouth have spent hundreds of hours on the beat to improve community safety.

Our patrol officer Sam, centre, pictured with Police Community Support Officers Alice and Simon on the beat in Weymouth

Our patrol officer Sam carried out more than 140 hours of foot patrols last month. Three new officers are currently being recruited to join him.

Sam issued 15 verbal warnings, two Community Protection Notices, one Community Protection Warning and undertook the removal of seven lots of abandoned property.

140 hours of foot patrols

Patrol officers are specially trained and employed by Dorset Council, who worked with Dorset Police, the Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, British Transport Police, Dorset County Council and Weymouth BID to set-up the patrols under the Community Safety Accreditation Scheme.

Sam said: “My role is to deter anti-social behaviour and reassure people that action will be taken. I am here to show that anti-social behaviour will not be tolerated.

“I have been very busy trying to cover all the areas in my patch, sometimes my time is taken up dealing with incidents and meeting other agencies, but I’m out on the beat as much as possible.

“I want people to know they can come and talk to me, especially if anything has made them feel unsafe. People can either speak to me or email me.”

Cllr Graham Carr-Jones, Dorset Council Portfolio Holder for Community Safety and Housing, said: “Having a visible presence in certain areas is important and so I am pleased that we are recruiting more patrol officers. We have listened to people’s concerns when deciding which areas to focus on. Weymouth is a wonderful town. We are working hard to improve community safety.”

“Having a visible presence is important”

Sam has been focusing his patrols on the town centre, the Esplanade, the train station and Lodmoor. He has dealt with a range of practical incidents recently including dealing with someone who was heavily intoxicated in the town centre, dealing with a case of indecent exposure and also dealing with a gang who arrived in town and began aggressively begging. They left after being issued with verbal warnings and have not returned.

Now the weather is warmer Sam has also been out on his bike, which allows him to cover even more ground. Anyone can email Sam, his address is: patrol@dorsetcouncil.gov.uk

Sam carries out certain police and council enforcement powers, such as issuing fixed penalty notices, and enforcing the Public Space Protection Order.  This order gives officers certain powers such as being able to require people to surrender alcohol in certain circumstances in designated areas.  Patrol officers also gather evidence and are involved in the enforcement of Community Protection Notices, which place restrictions on individuals that persistently act in an anti-social manner.

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Categories: Dorset

New councils pledge to support the Armed Forces community

Dorset For You - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 10:27

The new unitary authorities of Dorset Council and Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Council have signed the Dorset Armed Forces covenant.

The covenant is a pledge to treat those who serve or who have served in the armed forces and their families with fairness and respect in their communities, economy and society they serve with their lives.

Dorset has a large military presence, with 3,150 serving personnel across 4 bases. It is estimated there are around 1,575 spouses and 2,389 children related to those personnel.

The county is also home to two per cent of the UK’s veterans. The total number of members of the Armed Forces Community in Dorset is more than 100,000, around 12.9% of Dorset’s 771,900 population. This means that at least 1 in every 7 people in Dorset should have the capability to benefit from the provisions of the Armed Forces Covenant.

Cllr David Walsh, Dorset Council’s Member Champion for the Armed Forces and Chairman of the Armed Forces Covenant Programmes Board., said:

“Having had personal experience of being a member of the Royal Air Force I know how important it is that third sector support is not only available to Dorset’s vast Armed Forces Community, but that all information, services and support available is better understood and promoted, assisted through our one-stop-shop Veterans and Armed Forces Family Information points based in our local libraries.

“I feel a huge sense of relief that finally, through working closely with partners across Dorset, more is being done to support our local military community and that we are delivering on our promise, ‘to ensure that all those who serve or who have served in the armed forces, and their families, are treated fairly”.

Dorset has a two-year MoD Funded Programme to delivery of specific projects identified to support the Armed Forces community across Dorset.

Cllr Vikki Slade, Leader of BCP Council, said:

“I am delighted to officially show BCP Council’s commitment by the signing of the Armed Forces Covenant. It is really important we all do our part in treating serving members of the Armed Forces, veterans and their families within the BCP area with fairness and equity. They are a valued part of the community and we will do all we can to ensure local services can best meet their needs.”

The main partners in this programme are Dorset Council. Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Council, Dorset HealthCare University Foundation Trust, NHS Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner Dorset.

The overarching aim of the programme is to raise the profile of and to embed the Covenant in the day to day activities of all partner organisations across Dorset, ensuring that all members of the armed forces community are treated fairly and equitably.

The programme will oversee the formation of 13 Family Information points primarily located within libraries that will allow access to information and advice to the Armed Forces community across the whole of Dorset.

Find out more about the Armed Forces Covenant Programme 

 

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Categories: Dorset

Dorset Council celebrates prestigious Green Flag Awards

Dorset For You - Wed, 07/17/2019 - 17:54

A record number of parks and green spaces across the Dorset Council area have been awarded a Green Flag Award, representing the mark of a quality park or green space. Green spaces can be national nature reserves, picnic areas or an area of open space.


Avon Heath Country Park and Moors Valley Country Park, both near Ringwood, Durlston Country Park in Swanage, Thorncombe Woods near Dorchester and The Milldown and Stour Meadows in Blandford, have been recognised by the Green Flag Award Scheme as some of the very best in the world.

Thorncombe Woods, by Ian Metcalfe

Each of our parks and open spaces offer visitors a totally different experience. From the cliff-top nature reserve, teeming with life at Durlston to a bustling family friendly day out at Moors Valley Country Park and the history steeped Thorncombe Woods – Thomas Hardy’s birthplace – there is so much to see and explore.

These sites in Dorset are among a record-breaking 1,970 UK parks and green spaces and 131 in thirteen other countries around the world, that have received a prestigious Green Flag Award.

This international award, now into its third decade, is a sign to the public that the space boasts the highest possible environmental standards, is beautifully maintained and has excellent visitor facilities.

Cllr Ray Bryan, Portfolio Holder for Highways, Travel and Environment, said: “In Dorset Council’s first year, it is wonderful to have been awarded so many Green Flag Awards. They are so well deserved, and the parks and greenspaces themselves are wonderful places to discover.”

Giles Nicholson, Dorset Council’s greenspace manager said: “We’re really proud of our parks, picnic sites and greenspaces and we know how much they matter to residents and visitors. We are absolutely delighted to receive so many Green Flag Awards for these sites, which reflects the dedication of our ranger teams, volunteers and apprentices.”

International Green Flag Award scheme manager Paul Todd said “Each flag honours the thousands of staff and volunteers who work tirelessly to maintain the high standards demanded by the Green Flag Award. We congratulate each and every winner on their fantastic achievement.”

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Categories: Dorset

Durlston’s new Shed offers volunteering and socialising opportunities

Dorset For You - Wed, 07/17/2019 - 16:54

A new project at the Dorset Council run Durlston Country Park in Swanage is giving everyone the chance to share skills, make friends and come together through volunteering.

The Everyone Needs a Shed! project, offers a relaxed style of working and socialising, with gentle tasks like gardening, bird box making, green woodworking and more. Volunteers can come and go and the shed is open to all, including people with disabilities or long term health conditions, such as dementia.

The Shed is part of the Durlston Pleasure Grounds Project, which is working to enhance the Victorian landscape at Durlston for people and wildlife. It is supported by The National Lottery Heritage Fund and The National Lottery Community Fund.

Ali Tuckey, Project Leader for the Durlston Pleasure Grounds Project, explained: “This is such a great way to help look after this fantastic place, with no commitment or experience needed – just come along and we’ll put you to work, or just pop in for a cuppa and a chat.”

Cllr Ray Bryan, Dorset Council’s Portfolio Holder for Highways, Travel and Environment, said: “The Shed is not only located in a beautiful setting, but it also offers a brilliant way for people to share or learn new skills, meet like-minded people, take gentle exercise and be a part of the wider community of volunteers.”

The shed is open on Mondays between 10:00am-1:00pm, Wednesdays between 1:00pm-4:00pm and most Saturday mornings.

To find out more, visit www.durlston.co.uk or pop in for a chat.

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Categories: Dorset

North Dorset surface dressing continues

Dorset For You - Tue, 07/16/2019 - 13:01

Our surface dressing highway fixers are still in north Dorset reviving tired, rural roads by improving skid resistance and protecting them from water damage.

Work completed week ending 12 July:

  • Barnes Close – Station Road to end, Sturminster Newton
  • D31407 – from B3091 to High Street, West Orchard
  • High Street – from D31408 to D31405 at Orchard Water Bridge, West Orchard
  • High Street – from B3091 to D31407 at Vale Farm, West Orchard
  • Village Road – from D31405 at Orchard Water Bridge to C138, West Orchard
  • B3091 East Orchard School to Winchells Farm
  • Stocky Lane – B3091 to Village Road at Bowling Green Farm, East Orchard
  • Penn Hill – C52 crossroads, Bedchester to parish Boundary at Pen Copse

Our works schedule for the next two weeks, starting on Monday 15 July:

  • The Corner – from The Cross to Courtney Close, Shroton
  • D31305 – from Paynthouse Farm to B3091, Guy’s Marsh
  • D31305 – from Green Lane to Paynthouse Farm, Guy’s Marsh
  • Green Lane – Stour Row to Guy’s Marsh turning, Shaftesbury
  • Green Lane – from Guy’s Marsh turning to B3091, Hartgrove
  • D31301 – from Lymburghs Farm entrance to Higher Farm, Margaret Marsh
  • C14 – Moorhayes to Ram’s Hill at D30916 / D31301 crossroads, Todber
  • Angel Lane – Scotchy Lane to Stour Lane, Stour Provost
  • D30902 – from The Church to Trill Bridge, Fife Magdalen
  • D30902 – Trill Bridge to B3092, Fife Magdale
  • Great Down Lane – Love Lane to B3092,  Marnhull
  • Fillesymead – C15 to Fellowsmead, Marnhull
  • Fellowsmead – Fillesymead to C15, Marnhull
  • Common Lane – loop from C15, Marnhull
  • Jct C107 to Jct C021, Westbrook
  • Kendall Lane – from C142 to B3092, Milton-On-Stour
  • School Lane – from B3095 to adoption end, Milton-On-Stour
  • The Butts – Church Hill to Breach Lane, Shaftesbury
  • Foots Hill – from B3081 to A350, Cann
  • Chapel Hill, Compton Abbas

As we head into more rural areas, and work on lesser-known roads, please remember you can check where we are working by using the online roadworks map.

About the work

Our surface dressing gang is working 9am to 4pm in urban areas and 8am to 4pm in rural areas.

Surface dressing doesn’t take long and the road can be driven on as soon as it’s finished. Depending on the length of the road you live on, the road will be closed for around 1-2 hours while the treatment takes place.

There will be an advisory 20mph speed limit after the work while the loose stones ‘bed down’ into the bitumen. Travelling at this reduced speed will prevent skidding on the loose chippings, help ‘bed down’ the material and will save your paint work!

We sweep the road one to two days after the work to get rid of excess stones.

White lining reinstatement will follow on from this and is generally a week or so later.

Sorry for the inconvenience

We cannot work overnight as surface dressing relies on the evaporation of water from the bitumen binder (glue) for it to set, and it needs traffic to travel on the new surface for it to ‘bed down’ and lock onto the old surface.

We also cannot work in wet weather – any amount of rain or surface water dilutes the bitumen and so doesn’t hold the chippings in place – which is why our surface dressing programme runs from April through to September.

As this treatment is so weather dependent, dates are subject to change.

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Categories: Dorset

New CCTV centre opens

Dorset For You - Tue, 07/16/2019 - 12:45

A new CCTV centre has opened in Dorchester to improve safety.

Superintendent Caroline Naughton speaks to the media at the opening of the new CCTV centre

Dorset Council, Dorset Police and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner for Dorset have worked together to deliver the new £375,000 control room, which will help prevent, detect and reduce crime, as well as improve traffic management.

Helping to prevent, detect and reduce crime

The new centre features upgraded technology, including new digital radio systems, touchscreen control panels, interactive mapping software, upgraded monitors and better facilities for reviewing footage.

Representatives from Dorset Council and Dorset Police visited the new centre on Tuesday (16 July) to see it in action. Those visiting included Cllr Graham Carr-Jones, Dorset Council Portfolio Holder for Community Safety and Housing, Martyn Underhill, Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner and Superintendent Caroline Naughton from Dorset Police.

Cllr Carr-Jones said: “It is an impressive facility with better technology that will improve public safety. It’s a good example of public services pulling together efficiently to deliver improvements.”

Superintendent Caroline Naughton of Dorset Police said: “This is a fantastic example of all partners involved in community safety coming together to develop a CCTV system that is fit for purpose and meets all of our needs.  CCTV systems are vital for the prevention, detection and prosecution of crime and I am pleased that Dorset is now at the forefront of using the latest technology.”

Martyn Underhill, Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, said: “This represents a crucial modernisation of Dorset’s CCTV infrastructure and I am confident this important investment will enable agencies including the police and council to work more closely together to help keep people across the county safe.

“This state of the art centre will hopefully expand to enable other areas of Dorset to benefit from this innovation in the future.”

“State-of-the art centre will hopefully expand”

The digital radio system in the new control room can link to council staff on patrol including parking officers, Weymouth Town Council beach staff and uniformed patrol officers who tackle anti-social behaviour under the Community Safety Accreditation Scheme. It also links direct to Shop Watch, Pub Watch and Taxi Watch schemes. This means shopkeepers, publicans and taxi drivers can contact the CCTV control room direct. The control room is also connected directly to the police via the emergency services Airwave radio system.

The cameras also help to monitor traffic, dealing with any problems and supporting safe travel across the network. This is particularly useful during special events such as Weymouth Carnival, Weymouth IRONMAN 70.3 and the veterans’ parade.

The Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner’s Office contributed £263,000 to the project, while Dorset Council contributed £110,000. Apart from the Highways cameras, which operate across Dorset, the CCTV centre currently covers Bridport, Dorchester and Weymouth. Other parts of Dorset have separate CCTV systems, operated either privately or by town councils. The new centre could be expanded in the future to cover other parts of the county.

The operation of the CCTV centre is carefully managed and is governed by the Surveillance Camera Commissioner.

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Categories: Dorset

Sheep farmer sentenced for animal cruelty

Dorset For You - Mon, 07/15/2019 - 16:07

A Dorset sheep farmer has been prosecuted and fined after failing to adequately care for her animals and leaving dead sheep on her land. 

On 15 July 2019, at Weymouth Magistrates’ Court, Karen Harper (aged 51) of Charlton Marshall, near Blandford, Dorset, was today sentenced with a Community Order to carry out 180 hours of unpaid work and ordered to pay £2278 prosecution costs and a victim surcharge of £85.

Thin sheep found on Harper’s land

She had pleaded guilty on 24 June 2019 to nine offences under animal health and welfare legislation following investigation by the trading standards team, now part of Dorset Council.

Miss Harper pleaded guilty to three offences under The Animal Welfare Act 2006 of causing unnecessary suffering to her flock of over 75 sheep by failing to follow veterinary advice or provide appropriate care and treatment. She also pleaded guilty to two offences under The Welfare of Farmed Animals (England) Regulations 2007 of failing to care for sick animals and record the number that died; three offences under The Animal By-Products (Enforcement) England Regulations 2013 for failing to dispose of the sheep carcasses without undue delay and one offence of failing to tag sheep as required by The Sheep and Goats Records, Identification and Movement (England) Order 2009.

The court heard that in December 2018 a trading standards officer visited land near the village of Affpuddle in the Purbeck area of Dorset where Harper kept sheep. The officer found more than 25 sheep carcasses littering fields. Many of the remaining 75 sheep were very thin with little grass to eat and no additional feed.

The sheep were later examined by a veterinary officer from the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) who found 54 to be unacceptably thin and one sheep so thin and weak it had to be put to sleep. In addition 43 of the sheep were found not to be ear tagged which is a legal requirement to provide traceability of livestock and helps disease prevention and control.

Harper received a formal caution from trading standards for similar offences in 2017 but failed to follow the advice on caring for her animals given at that time.

Councillor Anthony Alford, Portfolio Holder for Customer, Community and Regulatory Services at Dorset Council said:

“Our Trading Standards team work with farmers and other livestock keepers to improve the welfare of their animals but where advice is ignored formal action is considered. All livestock keepers have a clear responsibility to ensure conditions they keep animals in and the care they are given is adequate and does not cause unnecessary suffering.”

For health and welfare advice on keeping farmed animals or to report an animal welfare problem Dorset residents can call the Trading Standards animal health line on 01305 224475, or email tradingstandards@dorsetcouncil.gov.uk.

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Categories: Dorset

Durweston flood arch update – 12 July

Dorset For You - Fri, 07/12/2019 - 16:28

Dorset Highways are on track to have the A357 at Durweston reopen at the end of next week.

Now that all 38 precast culvert units (each weighing 13t) have been installed activity across the site has spread out and fired up to get the remaining elements of the structures finished.

This week

Our guys have been on site most mornings from 5.30am and are working through to the early evening. They’ve also been working Saturdays and Sundays, with the hard work and dedication showing in the progress that has been made.

Retaining walls

Around 60 per cent of the gabion baskets are now in place. We’ve been forming the wire baskets in situ by hand and filling them with stone to form the retaining walls. These will support the road and channel flood water into the new culverts.

All of the gabion basket retaining walls have been started and are currently standing just over half the finish height at 2.5m of the final 3.5m.

Road reconstruction

All of the culvert unit surrounds have been backfilled with concrete, with the road above the culverts currently being constructed using a recycled, cement-bound material.

This material is made from road planings which are produced when old road surfaces are removed during resurfacing. Using this saves money and reduces the carbon footprint of our scheme.

This is around 30 per cent complete.

Bridge parapets

The pre-cast units, which attach to the end of the new culverts, have been installed and we’ve started the steel reinforcement work.

This is around 10 per cent complete and we will be continuing with this when the road is reopened to traffic.

Traffic lights upgrade

In amongst all our major construction activity, we’ve managed to bring forward the upgrade of the permanent signals on the A350/A357 junction.

We’ve installed new ducting and new poles. The new signal heads will be fitted and tested ready for opening the junction later this summer.

We’ve also started repairs to Durweston Bridge following a collision earlier this year.

Remember you can catch up on all the action by viewing our online timelapse camera.

Coming up…

It is going to be another busy week for our workers…all of the tasks above (with the exception of the parapets) has to be finished before Thursday 18 July.

Then the surfacing gang will be in Thursday and Friday to lay the new road surface. We’ll need to do some tidying up works and then the road will be ready to reopen on Sunday 21 July with three-way lights back in action.

We need the temporary traffic lights back in place so that we can safely finish the parapets, kerbing and traffic light upgrades. These are likely to be up until early August.

Please still allow extra time for your journeys in the area.

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Categories: Dorset

Dorset Council helped by police to successfully prosecute fly-tipper

Dorset For You - Fri, 07/12/2019 - 12:55

Enforcement Officers from the Dorset Waste Partnership (DWP) recently worked with Dorset Council’s Legal Services and the police to bring a fly-tipper to justice.

Dominic Adrian Woods (31, from Weymouth) was found guilty of fly-tipping in Whitcombe by Weymouth Magistrates Court on the 3 July 2019 following a trial.

Woods had already pleaded guilty to fly-tipping at The Grove Industrial Estate in Dorchester and two offences of failing to provide waste transfer notes under Section 34 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990.

The defendant ran a company called ‘Hashtag Trashtag’ but had also traded under the company names of ‘Trashtag Clearances’ and ‘Weymouth Vandyman’. The services he advertised – primarily through social media – were tip runs, clearances, light haulage, removals, deliveries and gardening.

On 28 June 2018, following contact through social media, Woods collected a substantial amount of household waste from a Dorchester householder, who paid £90 for waste disposal but was not given a Waste Transfer Note by Woods.

In July 2018, after Woods failed to keep up with payments on storage units he was renting at The Grove in Dorchester, the owner entered the units to discover a large amount of waste, which was legally defined as fly-tipping. Woods was given until the 13 July to completely clear out both units. However, this did not happen, and the waste was removed at a substantial cost to the owner.

In early July 2018, the manager of a bar in Weymouth contacted Woods asking him to remove around 40 bags of waste from the premises. Woods was paid £65 cash for disposal but was not given a Waste Transfer Note.

On the 19 July, DWP Enforcement Officer Jeremy Gallagher investigated a fly-tip situated off the A352 at Whitcombe, recovering evidence linking the waste to the household in Dorchester and the bar in Weymouth. Both the resident and bar manager confirmed that the evidence recovered was part of the waste removed by Woods.

After multiple requests to attend an interview were ignored by Woods, he was traced to premises in Portland and arrested by Dorset Police on suspicion of fly-tipping.

During interview with DWP Enforcement Officers, Woods confirmed that he ran a company called ‘Hashtag Trashtag’ but stated that he wasn’t even aware that he needed an Environmental Permit to keep waste at the storage units.

Regarding the Whitcombe fly-tip, Woods confirmed that he had collected around 40 bags of black bag waste from the bar but claimed that it was all glass which was recycled. However, when confronted with the fact that the waste recovered at the fly-tip comprised of till receipts, plastic mugs and paper towels, Woods denied the fly-tipping. When asked if he provided a Waste Transfer Note when he collected the waste he stated that he couldn’t remember and didn’t have any paperwork to check.

Woods also admitted collecting waste from a Dorchester householder, but again he didn’t have any paperwork to show that he gave her a Waste Transfer Note.

At trial, the matters put before the Court were:

The Court was also made aware that DWP Enforcement Officers had previously dealt with Woods in February 2018, handing him fixed penalties for fly-tipping at Whitcombe before and for failing to produce Waste Transfer Notes. Both fixed penalties were paid.

Because of this investigation, the defendant’s vehicle was also seized. Woods has been referred to Probation for Pre-sentence Reports and bailed to reappear at Weymouth Magistrates on Monday 12 August for sentencing.

Jeremy Gallagher, Enforcement Officer at the Dorset Waste Partnership, said: –

“This case is a great example of partnership working and shows that DWP Enforcement Officers will pursue criminals involved in this kind of crime.

We understand how people might be tempted to use rubbish disposal services from unverified businesses, especially those found online. However, if the price is too good to be true, the chances are that your waste is unlikely to be disposed of responsibly.

Always make sure you use trustworthy services if you need help disposing of waste, and always get a Waste Transfer Note from whoever you are handing it to that shows what the waste is, who is taking it and where it is going. This will protect you from possible prosecution if your waste is found fly-tipped.

Find out more about the DWP’s fight against fly-tipping and how you can help at the Tip-Off webpage.

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Categories: Dorset

Queen Thorne begin steps to shape the future of their area

Dorset For You - Fri, 07/12/2019 - 12:28

Dorset Council has approved a request from Queen Thorne Parish Council for the designation of a neighbourhood area, which is the first formal stage of preparing a neighbourhood plan.

Queen Thorne begin steps to shape the future of their area

Residents of Over Compton, Nether Compton, Sandford Orcas and Trent now have the opportunity to shape their community through the development of a neighbourhood plan for the area.

Call for volunteers

Queen Thorne Parish Council and Dorset Council are calling for volunteers to help with the formation of the neighbourhood plan.

Those interested in helping with the preparation of the plan can contact Mrs Rose Edwards, Parish Clerk, by email at clerk@queenthorneparishcouncil.gov.uk

Cllr David Walsh, Dorset Council’s Portfolio Holder for Planning, said:

“This is a great chance for people who have an interest in Over Compton, Nether Compton, Sandford Orcas and Trent to set out future development in the area. I encourage anyone interested in this opportunity to contact the parish council to find out more.”

What is a neighbourhood plan?

Neighbourhood plans were introduced in the Localism Act which passed through Government in 2011.

A neighbourhood plan aims to give residents more control over their local area, when plans for new homes, shops and offices in their town or village are considered.

Once the plan is written, it will be consulted on locally and submitted to the council for independent examination. It will also be subject to a local referendum to make sure it has the support of local people.

More information on neighbourhood plans can be found at dorsetcouncil.gov.uk

Any parish council or parish meeting that might be interested in forming a neighbourhood plan should contact planningpolicyteamb@dorsetcouncil.gov.uk for more information.

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Categories: Dorset

Travel advice for Dorset Seafood Festival 2019

Dorset For You - Fri, 07/12/2019 - 10:25

Nyetimber Dorset Seafood Festival at Weymouth Harbour takes place on 13 and 14 July – have you planned your journey?

Weather is expected to be fair, dry with sunny spells at times , especially on Sunday. Please allow plenty of time for your journey into Weymouth, and help us by not driving your vehicle into the town centre.

Travel news

Check for any travel disruptions on our website

Roads and town centre parking

Roads around the harbourside will be closed to ensure a car-free safe environment for festival-goers on Saturday 13 July and Sunday 14 July, including

  • The Esplanade (from the Kings Statue to The Pavilion)
  • Custom House Quay
  • Town Bridge
  • St Thomas Street
  • North Quay
  • Trinity Road
  • Cove Row

There will also be parking restrictions and other changes to traffic management.

Please note: permit holders for Zone F will only be able to park in Swannery Car Park this year and not in the Pavilion Car Park. Zone L permit holders can park at North Quay car park in available spaces behind the old council offices – accessed from High West Street past the Boot Inn.

The Pavilion Car Park will be closed due to building works and the event taking up most of the capacity. The Council Offices Car Park will be closed. It is expected that all other off-street car parks will be available as normal.

Roadworks
  • A354 Weymouth Way which was closed due to a burst sewer on 20 June, reopened on Wednesday 10 July and there are no traffic restrictions.
  • There are lane closures on Chafeys Roundabout (including A354 Weymouth Way and B3157 Granby Way) to facilitate pedestrians crossing in the roadworks area for separate long-term works to repair a gas escape

There are no other planned works expected to cause disruption.

Park & Ride

Avoid queues into Weymouth town centre by making use of the park and ride facility.

Parking is free all day, with a regular bus service picking up near the  site entrance – customers pay for travel on the bus.

Plan your visit using Weymouth Park & Ride

Bus

There are regular local bus services and also a regular Number 10 service between Dorchester and Weymouth, with the bus dropping off in the town centre.

Plan your bus journey.

Train

Weymouth train station is in the town centre, with a 15-minute stroll along the seafront to the harbour, where the festival is taking place.

Plan your train journey.

Cycle

Why not burn off those calories by travelling by bike?!

Plan your bike route.

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Categories: Dorset

Options for new health, care and housing hub in Wareham revealed

Dorset For You - Fri, 07/12/2019 - 10:15

Dorset Council along with NHS partners, co-hosted a stakeholder event this week to show options for new health, care and housing facilities on the Wareham middle school site.

This initiative is part of Dorset Council’s Building Better Lives scheme, which aims to use council-owned land to develop much-needed new housing and services for local communities. Dorset Council has worked in partnership with Wareham Town Council, Dorset HealthCare and Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group to develop this project.

The proposed scheme in Wareham will include new health and GP services, extra care housing, supported living (offering care for people with disabilities and long-term health conditions), recreational areas, and a range of affordable housing available to rent and buy through the open market. The scheme also offers potential solutions to some of the local traffic issues around the school.

The new health and care hub will host all the services currently available at Wareham Hospital, plus the opportunity to develop additional clinics and services. It will also integrate with the town’s GP practice – creating a more seamless, ‘one-stop shop’ for local residents.

High-quality, temporary housing units will be installed on the old middle school site for the first stage of the scheme. This will be available to local people with learning disabilities who are currently living in accommodation which doesn’t suit their needs, while more permanent properties are being built on site.

Cllr Laura Miller, Dorset Council’s Portfolio Holder for Adult Social Care and Health, said: “Rather than simply selling off council owned land to big property developers, we are focussing on providing much-needed housing and health and care services for local residents in Wareham. I’d like to thank Wareham Town Council and colleagues from the NHS for working with us in partnership to develop these proposals, and we look forward to continuing work on this exciting scheme.”

The meeting brought together stakeholders and partners and we are planning public information sessions along with Wareham Town Council and Friends of Wareham Hospital.

Planning permission will be sought towards the end of 2019, with work to begin on site and a public meeting planned for spring 2020. It is anticipated that the first phase of work will complete towards late 2021.

See the options in full

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Categories: Dorset

Licensing landlords could improve lives

Dorset For You - Thu, 07/11/2019 - 17:54

 Most people believe that licensing landlords in parts of Weymouth could improve the lives of vulnerable people.

Landlord licensing survey results

A survey, completed by 520 people earlier this year, revealed that most residents think licensing landlords could improve the way private rented housing is managed.

The survey revealed that 60 percent of people thought that the scheme would positively improve Melcombe Regis, while 23 percent thought it wouldn’t. A total of seven per cent did not know and 10 per cent did not have a view.

Under the Selective Licensing Scheme, only landlords who meet a ‘fit and proper person’ test would qualify for a licence. Landlords would also have to make sure that properties are maintained to a decent standard.

The idea was suggested by the Melcombe Regis Board, which was set-up to tackle inequalities. Life expectancy in Melcombe Regis is 10 years lower than other parts of Dorset and poor quality housing is a factor.

Life expectancy 10 years lower, poor housing is a factor

Cllr Graham Carr-Jones, Dorset Council Housing Portfolio Holder, said: “I’d like to thank the 520 people who took the trouble to have their say. Everyone who rents should be able to live in a decent home. Poor housing affects physical and mental health.

“We cannot ignore the fact that life expectancy in Melcombe Regis is 10 years less than other parts of Dorset, we have to face and tackle these issues, which is why Dorset Council is considering introducing a landlord licensing scheme.

“I’d like to make it clear that this scheme is being considered in addition to efforts to deliver more affordable and social housing, it is not instead of. Housing shortages mean tenants need more, not less, protection. Private rented housing is a free market where ‘going rates’ apply and there is no evidence from other areas that costs are passed to tenants.

“We recognise that most landlords operate responsibly and offer good standard and we work with many of them through our Landlords Local Authority Partnership.”

Most landlords operate responsibly

If introduced, Dorset Council would make no profit from the scheme and landlords would probably pay a small fee of around £100 a year.

Dorset Council works with landlords to improve housing. Current schemes include ‘Heat Melcombe Regis’, which sees free central heating made available as well as other measures to tackle fuel poverty. The council also supports and works with landlords through the Landlords Local Authority Partnership.

The survey results are now available.

More information on the council’s work with landlords is available here. 

 

 

 

 

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Categories: Dorset

Goulds Hill to close for further three days

Dorset For You - Thu, 07/11/2019 - 16:12

Dorset Highways will be returning to Goulds Hill, between Martinstown and Upwey, next week.

Two weeks work was completed earlier this month to rebuild and strengthen the edges of the carriageway and resurface a 1800m stretch of road.

Tests of the surface material have shown that it is unlikely to perform as expected and needs to be replaced.

Jack Wiltshire, Dorset Council Head of Highways, said: “Our priority is the safety of road-users and we need to replace this 40mm of surface material. We’ve identified the earliest opportunity in our programme to carry out the work – which is next week.

“We appreciate that this is terrible timing for residents and commuters, who have been unable to use the road this week because of sewer works by Wessex Water, but we will minimise disruption by overlaying the new material and carrying out the work outside of commuting times.”

Goulds Hill will be closed 9am to 5pm on Tuesday 16, Wednesday 17 and Thursday 18 July for a new surface course of material to be laid through the site.

The cost of this remedial work is being met by Dorset Highways partner Hanson UK.

Until this work can be carried out, an advisory 40mph speed limit will be in place.

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Categories: Dorset

Plans on display for upgrade to Gillingham junctions

Dorset For You - Wed, 07/10/2019 - 13:21

Residents are being invited to speak with the highways project team leading the redesign of four busy junctions through Gillingham.

Areas being looked at by the project

The improvements are being funded with £3.45m secured by the Dorset Local Enterprise Partnership through the Government’s Growth Deal.

Dorset Highways engineers are going to be in Gillingham next week to discuss plans to improve traffic flow by upgrading four busy junctions in the town centre:

  • B3081 Shaftesbury Road junction with Newbury (High Street)
  • B3081 Shaftesbury Road junction with B3092 New Road
  • B3081 Le Neubourg Way / Station Road
  • B3081 Shaftesbury Road / King John Road

Pedestrian and cycle facilities between Cemetery Road and Station Road, and around the B3081 junctions, are also being enhanced.

Plans will be on display, with engineers available to answer questions, at Gillingham Town Hall on Tuesday 16 July from 11am to 3pm and Thursday 18 July from 12.30pm to 7pm.

Councillor Ray Bryan, Portfolio Holder for Highways, Travel and Environment, said: “This investment into improving transport infrastructure is essential to unlocking new housing and employment land in the town.

“We’ve been working hard on redesigning four essential junctions through the centre of Gillingham to ensure that they aid this economic growth of the town.

“Improvements to walking and cycling facilities will also create greater travel choice for residents.”

Proposals also include investigating the potential for introducing one-way flow on Station Road (higher) to improve the pedestrian environment.

The funding will also enable the design of Enmore Green Link Road, between the B3081 and the A30 west of Shaftesbury, as part of the Gillingham Growth Package. The project aims to significantly reduce traffic travelling to and from Gillingham through Shaftesbury.

Anyone unable to attend the Town Hall exhibitions can see the proposals and fill in the feedback form online from Monday 15 July.

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Categories: Dorset

Bridport roundabout works ending for the summer

Dorset For You - Wed, 07/10/2019 - 11:49

Two nights of road surfacing at a busy Bridport roundabout will mark the end of work for the summer.

Dorset Highways has been working to improve the walking and cycling facilities on East Road Roundabout to promote sustainable transport links within the Bridport community.

Work started on 1 April but will now pause for the summer holidays to coincide with the nation-wide trunk road works embargo.

On Monday 15 July, A35 Sea Road South arm of the roundabout will be closed from 8pm until 6am Tuesday morning.

On Tuesday 16 July, East Street/ East Road arm of the roundabout will be closed from 8pm until 6am Wednesday morning.

Residents will still be able to access homes and businesses but there will be no through access at the roundabout.

Two toucan crossings, a new one on East Road and a replacement for the puffin on the A35 Sea Road South, will be switched on and ready for use on Wednesday 17 July.

Councillor Ray Bryan, Portfolio Holder for Highways, Travel and Environment, said: “As this road is a major route for residents, commuters and visitors the best way to surface the areas in question is with a night closure.

“We’ve completed most of our work at the roundabout including realigning kerbs, improving pedestrian refuge islands and upgrading the pedestrian crossing on the A35, however, due to the project starting later than we had hoped we will need to return later this year.”

Dorset Highways will return in September to carry out landscaping of the roundabout and to install new street lighting columns and signs, which will be followed by the final surfacing of on the footway/cycleway.

The roundabout improvement work is a collaboration with Highways England and Dorset Council. The work is being funded by Highways England, which is responsible for the A35 trunk road.

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Categories: Dorset

Rural surface dressing continues

Dorset For You - Tue, 07/09/2019 - 12:59

With the fantastic weather, our surface dressing highway fixers have been making great progress and are blazing round north Dorset.

Work completed week from Monday 24 June to Friday 5 July:

  • Langton Road – A354 Blandford Bypass to 150m past end of wall, Langton Long
  • West End – A350 to North Farm, Spetisbury
  • Bushes Road – from A350, Stourpaine to C13
  • Bramblecombe Road – C34, Cross Lanes, to Newton Farm Access, near Bramblecombe
  • Bramblecombe Road – Newton Farm Access south to C110, near Bramblecombe
  • Pleck Lane – from Ansty Hollow to Rawlsbury Farm, Higher Ansty
  • C49 – C139, No Man’s Land to C98 Cuckoo Lane, Bulbarrow Hill
  • Dark Lane, Fifehead Neville
  • Zoar Lane – from 376250-109264 To C98, Fifehead Neville
  • Zoar Lane – from Stockfield Drove to 376250-109264, Fifehead Neville
  • Stockfield Drove – Back Lane to C100, Hazelbury Bryan
  • Garlands Lane – from Church Walk to C100, Okeford Fitzpaine
  • Common Lane – New Road to end, Broad Oak
  • Angers Lane – New Road to Banbury Cross, Broad Oak
  • Ham Lane – Church Lane to end of housing, Hammoon
  • D31722 – C14 Lower Road to Ham Lane, Hammoon
  • D31722 – from housing at Hammoon to A347 New Cross Gate
  • Lanchard Lane – C99 Shillingstone Lane to end, Shillingstone
  • Everetts Lane – Gun Lane to adoption end, Shillingstone
  • Gunn Lane – from A357 to Wessex Avenue, Shillingstone
  • Pepper Hill – from Wessex Ave to Coombe Road, Shillingstone
  • Brodham Way – Puxey Lane to Gunn Lane/Pepper Hill, Shillingstone
  • White Pit – Coombe Road to A357, Shillingstone
  • Church Road – A357 around crescent back to A347, Shillingstone

Over the next two weeks, starting on Monday 8 July, we plan to treat:

  • Castle Lane – A357, New Cross Gate to Castle Avenue, Okeford Fitzpaine
  • Barnes Close – Station Road to end, Sturminster Newton
  • D31407 – from B3091 to High Street, West Orchard
  • High Street – from D31408 to D31405 at Orchard Water Bridge, West Orchard
  • High Street – from B3091 to D31407 at Vale Farm, West Orchard
  • Village Road – from D31405 at Orchard Water Bridge to C138, West Orchard
  • B3091 East Orchard School to Winchells Farm
  • Stocky Lane – B3091 to Village Road at Bowling Green Farm, East Orchard
  • Penn Hill – C52 crossroads, Bedchester to parish Boundary at Pen Copse
  • D31305 – from Paynthouse Farm to B3091, Guy’s Marsh
  • D31305 – from Green Lane to Paynthouse Farm, Guy’s Marsh
  • Green Lane – Stour Row to Guy’s Marsh turning, Shaftesbury
  • Green Lane – from Guy’s Marsh turning to B3091, Hartgrove

As we head into more rural areas, and work on lesser-known roads, please remember you can check where we are working by using the online roadworks map.

About the work

Our surface dressing gang is working 9am to 4pm in urban areas and 8am to 4pm in rural areas.

Surface dressing doesn’t take long and the road can be driven on as soon as it’s finished. Depending on the length of the road you live on, the road will be closed for around 1-2 hours while the treatment takes place.

There will be an advisory 20mph speed limit after the work while the loose stones ‘bed down’ into the bitumen. Travelling at this reduced speed will prevent skidding on the loose chippings, help ‘bed down’ the material and will save your paint work!

We sweep the road one to two days after the work to get rid of excess stones.

White lining reinstatement will follow on from this and is generally a week or so later.

Sorry for the inconvenience

We cannot work overnight as surface dressing relies on the evaporation of water from the bitumen binder (glue) for it to set, and it needs traffic to travel on the new surface for it to ‘bed down’ and lock onto the old surface.

We also cannot work in wet weather – any amount of rain or surface water dilutes the bitumen and so doesn’t hold the chippings in place – which is why our surface dressing programme runs from April through to September.

As this treatment is so weather dependent, dates are subject to change.

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Categories: Dorset

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