Cornwall

Cornwall’s teenage pregnancy rates the lowest ever

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 07/27/2017 - 17:26

The number of teenage girls getting pregnant in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly is continuing to fall, figures show.

The latest figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) shows that the rate has remained low over the last quarter and is now an average of 16 conceptions per 1000 women aged 15-17 for 2015. This is a 21 % reduction from the same period the previous year, and in total teenage pregnancies have more than halved since the national reduction strategy began in 1999.

To reduce teenage conception rates, good access to contraception services along with high quality relationships and sex education is needed to help young people make healthier choices and manage their sexual health. We’re making sure that more and more people who work with teenagers are getting training, which is vital in keeping the rates low.

As well as education, we need to continue ensuring contraception is available for all young people, as well as targeted support for those who face additional pressures. Being pregnant as a teenager can start a downward spiral. Being a teenage mum means that a girl is more likely to drop out of school, be less likely to support themselves, face higher rates of poverty and more reliant on the welfare system. By making education compulsory in schools, and having easy to access contraception we’re not only reducing the number of teenage pregnancies, but raising aspirations for many young people.

Dr Caroline Court, Interim Director of Wellbeing and Public Health for Cornwall Council said: “Education programmes and easier access to contraception have played a part in bringing down teenage pregnancy rates, along with access to friendly, non-judgemental staff. This means young people are better equipped to delay having sex until they are ready and when they are they know how to use contraception effectively. 

Access to a full range of contraception across the county is available through pharmacy, C-CARD, GPs and contraceptive and sexual health services such as Brook and the Sexual Health Hub at Royal Cornwall Hospitals. We know that young people want to access information and services in a different way. Going forward we hope to be able to continue this great work with innovative new online services, making it even easier to get information and services”.

Councillor Sally Hawken, Cabinet member for Children and Wellbeing added: “The continued reduction in conception rates is down to the hard work and determination of a wide range of partners in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly working in many organisations across health, education and social care sectors.

We can’t afford to be complacent because we are doing so well, we need to continue working innovatively and collaboratively to do our best for young people in Cornwall.

Advice on sexual health, contraception and location of C-Card and sexual health services can be accessed on the Cornwall SHAC website.

Story posted 27 July

Categories: Cornwall

Council considers future waste and recycling options

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 07/27/2017 - 12:23

Options for future waste and recycling services are currently being discussed by Cornwall Council with further stakeholder engagement to occur later this year.

Cornwall Council’s waste and recycling contract is one of the largest in the country – both in terms of the number of households from which waste is collected and sheer area we have to cover to keep the public space clean.

Cornwall Council’s current Waste and Recycling, Street and Beach Cleansing Contract ends in March 2020, and the Council has started work to look at options for a new waste contract. 

Cornwall Council currently has one of the lowest recycling rates in the country. Each household in Cornwall produces around 990kg of waste per year. Compared to other Councils, this is not a large volume of waste, but our recycling rates are not so strong with only 36% of waste recycled.

“In our residents survey you told us that the environment in which you live is important to you and so to help us protect our environment, we need to reduce waste and increase recycling rates in Cornwall from the current level of 36%” said Cllr Sue James, Cornwall Council cabinet member for Environment and Public Protection

“Reducing waste and increasing recycling is an important element of us delivering value for money. This saves money and improves efficiency and means we have to spend less time, energy and resources dealing with waste – because there is less of it in the first place”

As part of the contract considerations, five options were put forward to Cabinet at their meeting on 26 July as a starting point for members of the Overview and Scrutiny Committee to consider further.

Cllr Sue James continued: “This is just the start of the process, and we will be looking at best practice from other local authority areas and seeking advice from industry experts. Options will be considered by Members and a scrutiny and overview committee, which has been set up specifically to look at this strategy, to ensure this is in the interests of the people of Cornwall.

“Our concern is multiple – what’s best for the environment, is efficient and what’s best for residents. There will be lots of further discussions before any changes are considered”

 

Story posted 27 July 2017 

Categories: Cornwall

Brand new Cornish fire boat needs a name – but please, not Boaty McBoatface!

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 07/27/2017 - 12:20

A call has gone out to help name a brand new fire boat commissioned by Cornwall Fire, Rescue and Community Safety Service to help keep residents and visitors safe around the coast of Cornwall

This is the first especially built boat for the service and will be used for maritime incidents and in partnership with other emergency services for prevention, boat safety and as cover during busy events such as regattas.

The new boat needs a suitable name and that is where the public can get involved.

Station Manager Steve Wilkinson said: “We want the public to send us suggestions for a good name for the new boat which should be ready to launch later this year.”

Some things to bear in mind when making your suggestion:

  • Cornish links are encouraged for the suggested name
  • Keep it short - This is the sensible option in emergencies. Should you ever need to call for assistance, every second can count, so a shorter name is better.
  • Suitability - keep your name suggestion family friendly.
  • Safety - Try repeating your chosen name out loud, as if in a call to the Coast guard for example, and assess how it sounds. You need to make sure your suggested name is easy to say and hear in case of an emergency.

The deadline to submit a suggestion is 5pm on 07 August and you can find full details of how to get involved in naming the fire boat on our website.

The Cornwall Fire, Rescue and Community Safety Service will consider all the suggestions and then open up a poll where the public will be able to vote for their favourite name.  Once the vote has closed and the new name is confirmed, the person who suggested the winning name will be invited along to the boat naming ceremony at the end of the summer.  

Station Manager Steve Wilkinson said: “We are pleased to be launching our new fire boat, which will primarily be kept on a berth at Falmouth Marina and will be dealing with maritime incidents and boat safety. I’m looking forward to meeting the person who has suggested the winning name when we hold the launch event in the coming months.  I’m sure it will help us to promote the use of this boat in dealing with maritime incidents and boat safety.”

Please note that ‘Boaty McBoatface’ is already in use elsewhere and so won’t be considered.

Submit your suggested name online: www.cornwall.gov.uk/fireboat

Keep up to date with Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service on social media like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

 

Story posted 27 July 2017 

Categories: Cornwall

Council Leader calls for strong and united Cornwall

Cornwall Council News feed - Wed, 07/26/2017 - 14:43

The Leader of Cornwall Council has called on all councillors to work together to put the future of Cornwall first and ensure a better future for local residents.

In his first “State of Cornwall” address Adam Paynter said that Cornwall needed to be strong and united if it was to conquer the challenges it faced over the next four years.

Explaining that overcoming these challenges, which included a growing population; increasing demands for services, particularly for the most vulnerable, and an underperforming economy, at the same time as the potential impact of Brexit, Councillor Paynter said that councillors needed to put party politics aside.

“The good news is that Cornwall is better placed than most to achieve this goal.” he said. “We are blessed with a committed and skilled workforce, led by a first class Chief Executive and senior management team, with committed partners, who have already helped the Council achieve great things and laid the foundations for greater success.

“But if we are to deliver our priorities and create the Cornwall our residents and businesses want and serve, we need to work together and put the future of Cornwall first.”

You can read the full transcript of Council Leader’s State of Cornwall in the National Context below:

As Members will be aware, the Leader’s State of Cornwall address was deferred from the Annual Council meeting until today to allow for the election of the Leader.

However, members will recall that the Chief Executive delivered a very honest Stewardship of the Council address at the meeting and I want to reiterate a number of the important points she made.

Without doubt the next four years will provide a set of challenges that only a strong and united Cornwall can conquer.

The scale of those challenges are so great that, irrespective of the make-up of the political administration, there has to be a team approach which transcends national politics in Cornwall’s best interest.

So what are those fundamental challenges:

  • Firstly, it is evident population is growing and is expected to reach 633,000 by 2035; but growth isn’t consistent across Cornwall with the number of people living in popular coastal towns falling – Padstow and St Ives being prime examples where second home ownership is resulting in fewer all year round residents.
  • Secondly, population change is having a profound impact on services; 1 in 4 of residents will be 65+ by 2019 and by 2025 36% of residents are expected to be living aged 85 and above.
  • Thirdly, our settlement pattern presents challenges; 60% of our population live in key settlements of less than 3,000 people. Allied to the changes in age profile this raises profound questions about how we meet the future needs of residents in these isolated communities.
  • Fourthly, deprivation remains a persistent concern; Around 69,450 of Cornwall’s population live in the 20% most ‘deprived’ communities in England and 36,000 of households are calculated to be in fuel poverty.
  • Finally, and somewhat sobering, despite investment our economy is still underperforming; just taking GVA per capita as an example, in 2015 Cornwall was ranked 37th out of 40 regions - the same ranking as in 1999!

In my view many of these challenges risk being intensified by the impact of Brexit on Cornwall.

That is why Cornwall needs to speak with a strong and united voice to ensure that the Brexit settlement supports Cornwall’s economy and doesn’t send it backwards.

We need to seize the opportunities provided by Brexit and call on the Government to adopt the principle of ‘double devolution’ to ensure that powers repatriated from the EU do not stop at Westminster, Stormont, Cardiff Bay and Holyrood – they also get devolved to Cornwall.

But to do so we need to be viewed by the Government as being credible and capable.

That means making sure every penny of the remaining EU funding is spent wisely and timely – and the dualling of the A30 at Temple and Higher Carblake is a very well-timed and prime example of Cornwall Council doing precisely that.

We need to continue to show the Government that we can deliver transformational projects of that nature to maximise our chances of gaining a share of the proposed UK Shared Prosperity Fund that is equivalent to the amount of EU funding Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly will lose as a result of Brexit.

The Chamber also needs to stand together in order to put the case to the Government for a fairer funding settlement for Cornwall.

An alternative funding formula has been devised by Leicestershire County Council based on actual cost drivers, such as deprivation levels, sparsity and age profile – the very challenges I outlined earlier.

If the Government adopts that model, Cornwall would receive an extra £45m every year.

I hope that incentivises collaboration given the positive impact that would have on the lives of thousands of people in Cornwall... especially as the biggest service risk that we face over the four years relates to people services.

People are living much longer often with highly complex needs and multiple conditions, there is greater demand to help vulnerable children and their families and the Council’s role in overall educational standards is more important than ever.

That is precisely why this issue is at the forefront of our Priorities for Cornwall.

And we’ve acted on words with a report being considered by Cabinet tomorrow that sets out the direction of travel for people services that will transform and improve the health and social care offer in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.

This is such an important issue that I urge Members to put party politics aside in order to achieve this critical goal.

Cornwall's economy

And now to the significant issue of our economy, which is another key feature of our Priorities for Cornwall.

I’m determined that this administration addresses the issue of the significant gap between income levels and house prices.

To do so will require the Council to take even more direct intervention and delivery than witnessed in previous years.

In practical terms this means rethinking our own approach to investment so we are in a position to deliver the Local Plan and change the relationship with developers to unlock stalled regeneration schemes that create inclusive growth and increase prosperity for all.

Furthermore, Cornwall needs to be considered as an investable proposition and I’m not sure that is the case at the moment.

We need to provide a greater certainty of approach and narrative as we’ve got a number of major regeneration schemes that provide opportunities that haven’t yet been realised – Hayle Harbour being a prime example.

Again, we’ve wasted no time in delivering on our Priorities. At tomorrow’s Cabinet meeting we will be considering an ambitious programme of additional capital investment that will enable the Council to deliver much needed affordable homes, employment space and infrastructure to meet the needs of our communities.

Brexit

As stated in our Priorities for Cornwall, I’m determined to ensure that Cornwall is Brexit ready and in my opinion this requires greater collaboration at a regional level to strengthen our economy.

Cornwall will only be able to attract the levels of global investment that we need if it is part of a strong South West offer. The North and the Midlands are already ahead of us in boosting their economy through regional collaboration and we need to catch up quick.

That means making sure Cornwall plays a leading role in generating an alliance across all the councils and LEPs to shape that South West offer, so that the area is recognised worldwide as an excellent opportunity for trade and investment.

Connecting Cornwall

Critical to developing our economy is improving our connectivity, both within Cornwall and with the rest of world.

That’s why Connecting Cornwall is also one of our Priorities.

Having recently completed the dualling of one notorious 2.8 mile section of the A30, our focus switches to the 8.7 mile section of single carriageway between Carland Cross and Chiverton Cross.

An important milestone was achieved at the beginning of the month with confirmation of the preferred route for the dualling of this stretch, heralding the start of the detailed design and consent process with work hopefully starting on the £200m project in 2020.

Our pledge to improve Cornwall’s connectivity extends beyond roads and includes continued enhancements of our rail, air and bus networks; with the aim of creating an integrated public integrated transport system over the next two years.

In part this has been made possible by the Devolution Deal signed in 2015 which, two years on, is clearly starting to demonstrate the benefit of Cornwall being given greater autonomy from the Government.

With delivery accelerating on first Devolution Deal, Cornwall is well placed to push for more powers and that is precisely why it is part of our Democratic Cornwall priority.

And that’s why I hope members will support the recommendation of Constitution and Governance Committee later in the agenda to form a new strategic Leadership Board for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly. This is a key element of our governance review, which itself was triggered by the Government stating in the Deal that maintaining the status quo would be an impediment to further devolution.

Devolution

Devolution both to Cornwall and within Cornwall illustrate the brave and bold steps the Council must continue to make. Bidding to become the UK’s first Spaceport and a global leader in renewable energy are two other examples of the level of ambition that we need to strive for and achieve.

And we need to move with pace; the reduction of the Government grant to the Council from £404m in 2010 to £57m by 2020, coupled with the premature loss of EU funding, requires even more urgency to generate growth and create additional income to compensate for this deficit.

The good news is that, having recently attended the Local Government Association Conference, it is apparent that Cornwall is better placed than most to achieve this goal.

We are blessed with a committed and skilled workforce, led by a first class Chief Executive and senior management team, with committed partners, who have already helped the Council achieve great things and laid the foundations for greater success.

But I close this State of Cornwall speech where I began, by reiterating the need for this Chamber to work together and put the future of Cornwall first.

Story posted 26 July 2017

 

Categories: Cornwall

Coverack's beaches and bathing waters are safe to enjoy again

Cornwall Council News feed - Wed, 07/26/2017 - 09:28

Coverack is now very much open for business, with hotels and holiday accommodation and shops, cafes and restaurants welcoming both local residents and visitors.

At the same time work on the recovery is continuing, with support for disposing of waste items generated by the floods, repairs to minor roads and sections of the coastal footpath damaged by the flood water, and advice, information and guidance available.

Council staff are continuing to work with Volunteer Cornwall and will be available to meet local residents in the Paris Hotel between 10 am and 2pm over the next few days.  The emergency helpline set up by the Council immediately following the floods will be live until the end of this week for anyone who has not been able to speak face to face with a member of staff.  After this members of the public with queries can contact staff in the Council’s contact centre on 0300 1234 100.

The skips provided by the Council will remain in place on Mill Road today (Tuesday 25 July) for people to dispose of the waste items.  After this householders will be able to contact the Council’s waste team on 0300 1234 141 to arrange collection of furniture, white goods etc damaged by the floods for the rest of the week.

Following confirmation that the potential pollution problems caused by the flood damage have been resolved, the warning signs have been removed and people are being encouraged to enjoy Coverack’s beautiful beaches and bathing waters.

“ We said last week that our aim was to get Coverack back on its feet as quickly as possible” said Council Leader Adam Paynter.   “ I am delighted that we have achieved this.

“Like Local Member Julian Rand , I have been humbled by the way everyone has worked together to support the people and businesses affected by the floods.  We know that there is still more to do and I can reassure the local community that we are not leaving just because the road has re opened today.  I said at the first residents meeting that we would remain in the village until the repairs had been completed and that is what we will do.

“Coverack is very much open for business and we will be working with the Local Enterprise Partnership and other partners to promote this message loud and clear”.

Story posted 25 July 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Prestigious Green Flag Award for four Cornwall parks

Cornwall Council News feed - Tue, 07/25/2017 - 17:57

Four of Cornwall’s most popular parks have been awarded the prestigious Green Flag Award for 2017.

The four parks which received the award this year are Victoria Park in Redruth, Morrab Gardens in Penzance and Queen Mary Gardens and Gyllyngdune Gardens in Falmouth.

This national award, now in its third decade, was awarded to the parks on Wednesday 19 July and is a sign to the public that the space boasts the highest possible environmental standards, is beautifully maintained and has excellent visitor facilities.

Cornwall Councillor Sue James, Portfolio Holder for Environment and Public Protection, said: “Running a park that is well-used and valued by its community is about more than just cutting the grass. Effective management and the use of skilled staff, along with support of the local community, are key to creating fantastic public parks. The Green Flag Awards are public recognition of that.

“Access to good quality green space is vital if we are to tackle some of the challenges that we face, including the growing problem of obesity, the rise in mental health issues and the feelings of being disconnected from the communities in which we live. Research shows that having well-managed, accessible green space contributes to tackling many of these issues.”

It's the first time that Victoria Park in Redruth has been recognised with a Green Flag. Feedback from the Green Flag Award independent judge included: “The enthusiasm of the staff and volunteers was very evident and they all take great pride in their park and their efforts should be applauded.”

Local Cornwall Councillor for Redruth South, who is also the Chairman of the Friends of Victoria Park, Ian Thomas, said: “The Green Flag Award is not just a national recognition of this wonderful green space; its flora and fauna; features and facilities; it pays tribute to all of the time and effort given to the park by our volunteers, Cornwall Council and CORMAC.  I  am sure that I speak for everyone involved and the people of Redruth, when I say how immensely proud we and our town are.”

The Green Flag Award – the mark of a quality park or green space – has been awarded to four parks across Cornwall marking them as officially among the very best green spaces in the country.

A report by the Heritage Lottery Fund, State of UK’s Public Parks, suggests that in the UK 34 million people visit a park regularly. To put this into context, more people visit one in a year than voted in the 2015 General Election. 

Research by Cornwall Council shows 75% of residents can walk to a park or open space from their home; 66% of Cornish residents visit parks or open spaces at least once per week and 95% of Cornish residents believe having good quality public open spaces is very important.

Story posted 25 July 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Residents warned against scam Council Tax calls

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 07/24/2017 - 17:24

Cornwall Council issued a fresh warning today after a Truro man became the latest to receive a phone call out of the blue from someone claiming to be from the “Council Tax” department.

The Truro man, who received the telephone call late last Friday morning, told Cornwall Council: “The caller said he was from the Council Tax office and he had my name and address. But I realised it wasn’t a local number and when I confronted him and told him it sounded like a scam he hung up.”

Jenny Lawson, Revenues and Assessment Manager at Cornwall Council, urged caution if residents had concerns about the validity of calls saying: “Unfortunately, this sounds like a common telephone scam. Bogus callers will try all sorts of approaches to try and obtain personal bank details so they can access bank accounts and steal from people. Cornwall Council may call residents who owe council tax to ask them to pay, however this would only be after a bill and further letters have been sent. During a conversation we’ll refer to our council tax correspondence so residents know it’s a genuine call.”

Anyone receiving a phone call, text or email asking for personal or bank information should treat the contact as suspicious and make a report. Possible scams can be reported to the national Police scams investigation team and to Cornwall Trading Standards via the Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06.

Residents wanting to verify the details of anyone from Cornwall Council can ring the Contact Centre 0300 1234 100.

24 July 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Work to start on air quality action plan for Grampound

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 07/24/2017 - 17:04

Work is to begin on an action plan to improve air quality in Grampound following the declaration of the village as an Air Quality Management Area.

Earlier this year, Cornwall Council held a public consultation to ask people for their views on air quality in Grampound.  People who responded to the consultation agreed that action was needed to improve air quality in the village.  The official designation of the Air Quality Management Area on 24 July formally acknowledges that need and is the first step towards creating an action plan for the village.

Councils are required to monitor air quality in their area against national targets and to declare areas with poor air quality as Air Quality Management Areas.  Cornwall Council has been monitoring Grampound since 2014, with results showing that areas of the village have excessive levels of traffic related nitrogen dioxide, particularly the eastern end of Fore Street.

Sue James, Cornwall Council Cabinet Member for Environment and Public Protection, said: “Declaring the Grampound Air Quality Management Area is an important first step towards improving the quality of the air in Grampound.  Local ideas will help us with the next important step of drafting the action plan to improve air quality in the village. Emissions from diesel engine vehicles is one of the main reasons for poor air quality.  I drive an electric car, and I would urge anybody thinking about changing their car to consider the environment when making their choice.”

Bob Egerton, Cornwall Councillor for Probus, Tregony and Grampound, said: “Cornwall Council’s Public Protection and Transport and Infrastructure services will work together to produce the action plan to improve air quality in Grampound, and suggestions  from local people received during the recent consultation will be considered and investigated further.  A draft action plan will be produced within 12 months and the Council will then ask residents and businesses for their views again before a final plan is published.” 

There are seven other Air Quality Management Areas in Cornwall, which include Camborne-Pool-Redruth, Truro, St Austell, Bodmin, Camelford, Tideford and Gunnislake.

As part of its Clean Air for Cornwall Strategy, Cornwall Council has already introduced a range of projects and policies to help improve air quality across Cornwall.  These include promoting walking and cycling, improving public transport, introducing car clubs, setting emission standards for taxis, minimising emissions from bus and works vehicle fleets, requiring electric vehicle charging points in new build homes, working with employers and schools to develop travel plans, and promoting mixed use development in areas close to public transport and facilities. 

Over the next 12 months, Cornwall Council will investigate specific measures to improve air quality in Grampound.  This work could include further traffic studies and appraising options that could be included in the draft action plan for the village.

More information about the Grampound Air Quality Management Area and the Clean Air for Cornwall Strategy is available on our air quality pages.

Story posted 24 July 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Local community and partners work flat out to ensure Coverack is open for business

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 07/24/2017 - 15:44

Just six days after devastating flash floods swept through Coverack, the main road will be re- opened to traffic today after the local community and partners worked flat out to ensure that the village is open for business in time for the peak summer season.

Four inches of rain (100mm) fell in under three hours on Tuesday, 18 July, causing unprecedented damage to homes, businesses and roads in the village. One of the most significant areas of damage was to the main road into the village – the B3294 – forcing it to be closed to traffic.

The “road closed” signs will be removed and the road re opened under traffic lights at 2pm today (Monday 24 July) ensuring the village can remain open for business.

Councillor Geoff Brown, the Council’s Cabinet Member for Transport, paid tribute to the efforts of everyone who has been involved in the clean up.

“This has been a real partnership between the Council, the Environment Agency and South West Water working with voluntary organisations and the local community to get the village back on its feet as quickly as possible“ said Councillor Brown.

“The emergency services have rightly been praised for their fantastic response on the night of the floods, and since then all agencies have worked incredibly hard to support the local community.

“I would particularly like to pay tribute to the CORMAC teams who have worked so hard to repair the damage to the road and ensure that it can be re opened today, significantly earlier than originally anticipated, to members of our Localism team who have been at the Paris Hotel every day to help people affected by the devastating floods.  Most importantly, I’d like to pay tribute to the local community who have faced a very difficult week and rallied round to support each other and showed what the spirit of the village reflects”.

Julian Rand, MBE, the Cornwall Councillor for St Keverne and Meneage, said “As the Local Member, I have been astonished and humbled by the massive efforts of Cornwall Council and Cormac in restoring a vital access road to the beautiful seaside village of Coverack so soon after the disaster.  Everyone involved has worked together with the residents and local businesses on delivering a well co-ordinated plan to restore services and provide help and assistance to those affected in the village and surrounding areas.

“I was in the village this morning with the Chairman and Coverack  members of St Keverne Parish Council who, together with  a representative of the Cornwall Community Foundation, are establishing an emergency help fund supported by public donations.

“Of course there is still more to do, but with the resilience of the local communities and the outstanding  support of the Cornwall Council team, I'm confident that all short, medium and longer term issues will be satisfactorily resolved.”

A team of 30 people from CORMAC helped to clear tonnes of debris from the road before laying a total of 330 tonnes of base and 200 tonnes of surface layer over the weekend.

Andy James, Head of Highways and Environment at CORMAC, who has been in the village for the past six days, said "Delivering the recovery phase in such a short space of time was a real challenge, but our teams were determined to get the community back on its feet.  The road was seriously damaged and, in some parts, washed away completely. To have it open in such a short space of time is testimony to the spirit and dedication of all the teams involved and the people of Coverack.

“We know that there is still more work to, and we will be continuing to work with partners and the local community until this has been completed.   We said we would stay until we finished the job and we are doing just that. “

Council staff have been at the Paris Hotel every day since the floods, including over the weekend, to provide information and support local residents. 

To date 23 households and two businesses have been helped with a wide range of issues, including finding temporary accommodation for five individuals and families who have been unable to return to their own homes.  The team have also visited 29 properties in the nearby village of St Keverne which were also affected by the flash floods.

There have also been 81 calls to the helpline set up by the Council on Wednesday morning.  

Local crews from St Keverne Community Fire Station have continued to support to residents and help with the removal of water where possible. Fire crews have also offered home fire safety checks to local residents and ensured properties have working smoke alarms in both Coverack and in St Keverne, and tested the fire hydrants in the Coverack area to confirm they are fully working and available for use if required.

Environment Agency Field Services staff have also been in Coverack clearing debris from watercourses to reduce the risk of any further flooding and assisting the  Council with the wider recovery operation.  Waste Officers from the Environment Agency have helped ensure that waste from flooded properties, and flood debris left on the roads and beach is cleared from the village quickly.  They have provided advice and guidance on how the waste can be safely stored while it is tested and appropriate treatment and disposal arranged.

The Environment Agency has also confirmed the pollution problems caused by the flood damage have now been resolved, paving the way for the bathing waters to be re-opened.  

“It’s great to see that Coverack really is open for business again less than a week after such a disastrous flood.” said Ben Johnstone, Area Flood Risk Manager at the Environment Agency.  “There’s lots more to do, but I’d like to give a huge thank you to everyone who has worked so hard over these last few days.”

Business and tourism leaders have welcomed the speedy response from partners which has meant that the village will be open to business ahead of the main summer season.

The Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership will now be co-ordinating an ‘open for business’ campaign with key business groups such as Visit Cornwall and the Cornwall Chamber of Commerce’. 

Mark Duddridge, Chair of the Partnership, said, “Cornwall Council’s response to this awful event in Coverack has been fantastic, and getting the road into the village open so quickly is hugely important for residents and businesses alike.   It’s now going to be critical that we get the message out there that Coverack is very much “open for business”.

Malcolm Bell, Head of Visit Cornwall, said “Cornwall is an amazing place, it has spectacular scenery, a unique culture and a Cornish spirit flowing through all of our communities.  The flash floods of Coverack and the resultant response shone a spotlight on how Cornwall and Cornish communities pick themselves up and get on with the job.  The combination of community response, the tremendous and impressive action by Cornwall Council and other agencies is truly exemplary.

“Coverack is not only open for business but up and ready to welcome  visitors and tourists throughout the key summer holiday weeks . “

“From a business perspective Cornwall Chamber of Commerce is delighted that Cornwall Council, CORMAC and all concerned have been able to act with such alacrity to get Coverack open for business so quickly after the dramatic event last week“ added Kim Conchie, Chief Executive of the Cornwall Chamber of Commerce.

“It's crucial that small businesses are able to maximise income in these important summer weeks  and this swift action has demonstrated that the Council understand the pressures here. Well done to all involved!”.

Story posted 24 July 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Cornwall Council continues to work with partners to repair road and support residents and businesses in Coverack

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 07/24/2017 - 09:32

Work is continuing today to repair the main road into Coverack and support the local residents and businesses which were affected by the devastating flash floods which swept through the village on Tuesday evening.

Yesterday the Council confirmed that it expected the road to re open early next week, significantly earlier than originally predicted, and today teams from CORMAC will be continuing to work on reconstructing and then resurfacing the stretch of road damaged by the floods with 150 tonnes of new tarmac. Once this has been completed the road will be re opened under traffic light control.

Local Cornwall Councillor Julian Rand has been supporting the local community throughout the devastating event and has praised the way everyone has pulled together .

"The response to this extremely damaging event by the local inhabitants has been amazing - brave, resilient, working to help one another and doing so with a smile” he said. “Cornwall Council’s response has been fast and very effective and, together with the hard work of the Cormac teams, shows how much a well co-ordinated approach can achieve. All the residents I have spoken to have been extremely appreciative of the work which has been carried out to date.

“My sincere thanks go to the Council Leader, Adam Paynter, and all my Council and officer colleagues, to Cormac and to members of the Localism team who are co-ordinating all responses and providing affected residents with advice , information and practical help. I would also like to thank local businesses, including the Paris Hotel, the Village Shop, Bookers and so many others for their ongoing help.

“I pray that it will not be too long before this lovely seaside village is fully restored to its former glory."

Council staff will be at the Paris Hotel to provide advice and support to residents between 10am and 4pm today (Saturday 22 July) and tomorrow, and early next week and will ensure an ongoing commitment to the community. People can also access assistance via the Council’s helpline 0800 7313247.

Skips are available for rubbish and arrangements are now in place for people needing to dispose of larger household items such as sofas and carpets.

People wishing to volunteer can also contact the Council’s helpline on 0800 731 3247. The Council is working with Volunteer Cornwall to coordinate where help is most needed.

The Cornwall Community Foundation can provide financial assistance to affected residents needing immediate help. Details on how to access this can be obtained from the Community Link Officers or from the Cornwall Council helpline - 0800 731 3247.

Work has progressed on providing temporary parking on the outskirts of the village, and an Age UK Cornwall shuttle bus will be operating next week, from Monday 24 July, between the local Community Primary School field to the centre of the village between 9am and 4.30pm every day until the road is re-opened.

The Council’s website has useful information on flood recovery www.cornwall.gov.uk/coverack and we will be posting updates specifically about what is happening in Coverack. For further information on the road reconstruction see CORMAC’s Coverack page which will be updated daily.

People who wish to make a donation can do so via Cornwall Live’s just giving page https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/CornwallLive and anyone wanting to offer practical help can call the helpline 0800 731 3247.

Story posted 22 July 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Cornwall Council announces road into Coverack expected to open next week

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 07/24/2017 - 09:29

With recovery efforts still in full swing, the main road into Coverack is expected to open next week after devastating floods hit the small community, significantly ahead of the original projected timescales. The news was shared with residents at a meeting hosted by Cornwall Council and held at the Paris Hotel in Coverack this morning.

Councillor Geoff Brown, the Cabinet Member for Transport, told the meeting around 40 CORMAC staff had been working on repairing the damage caused by the floods since Tuesday evening. “It’s fantastic news that we expect to re-open the road into the village early next week. Subject to the weather we expect reconstruction work to be finished over the weekend, with the road resurfaced and open next week. “

100 tonnes of debris were cleared from the road through the village on Wednesday to allow access to the nursing home and enable people access to their properties. A further 250 tonnes of material was removed yesterday.

CORMAC teams have also been checking and clearing highways drains and culverts, as well as re grading private lanes to ensure that residents can access their properties.

Council Leader Adam Paynter also attended the residents meeting and acknowledged the efforts of all involved. “It has been truly impressive the way agencies, volunteers and the local community have pulled together. There have been some remarkable examples of individuals and organisations going over and above to help others, from local businesses donating goods and equipment to the many volunteer organisations who have pitched in to help.

“It’s fantastic news that the road is due to be re-opened earlier than expected and a real testament to CORMAC for their hard work and commitment. I am sure that no-one who saw the level of damage caused to the road would have thought that it could re open to traffic in a week.

“While a tremendous amount has been achieved over the past four days, there is still more to do - all the partners are working as a team to support the village and we will continue until all this work has been completed.

“I would specifically like to acknowledge the owners of the Paris Hotel who have generously allowed Council staff to use their premises as a base to meet with local residents”.

Local Cornwall Councillor Julian Rand has also been in the village to offer his help and support to those affected by the flooding and has praised the strength of community spirit and the support which has been provided by the agencies and voluntary organisations.

Council staff will remain at the Paris Hotel to provide advice and support to residents between 10am and 2pm on Saturday 22 and Sunday 24 July, as well as every day next week. People can also access assistance via the Council’s helpline 0800 731 3247.

Skips are available for rubbish and arrangements are now in place for people needing to dispose of larger household items such as sofas and carpets.

People wishing to volunteer can also contact the Council’s helpline on 0800 7313247. Council is working with Volunteer Cornwall to coordinate where help is most needed.

The Cornwall Community Foundation can provide financial assistance to affected residents needing immediate help. Details on how to access this can be obtained from the Community Link Officers or from the Cornwall Council helpline - 0800 731 3247.

Work has progressed on providing temporary parking on the outskirts of the village, and an Age UK Cornwall shuttle bus will be operating next week, from Monday 24 July, between the local Community Primary School field to the centre of the village between 9am and 4.30pm every day until the road is re-opened. We are very grateful to the school for letting us use their field and Age UK for responding so quickly.

Potential pollution from a broken sewer line remains a health concern. While there are no reported issues with mains supply drinking water, the breach of the main sewage line means the local streams and beach may be contaminated. Precautionary warning signs have been placed near the beach and two local streams while works are carried out to repair the breach.

People are advised not to go near the water and if they come in contact with the water to make sure they wash their hands and follow good hygiene practices. Precautions should also be taken with regards to pets and livestock.

Anyone who gets their drinking water from a private water supply such as a borehole, spring or well which has potentially been covered by floodwater is advised to look out for a change in water quality, such as the water becoming discoloured or there is a change in taste or smell, should assume the water is unsafe to drink unless boiled and should continue to use boiled water for drinking and bathing until the supply has been tested and shown to be safe.

People with private drainage such as septic tank or cess pits are also being advised to have them checked to ensure that they are still operating correctly after the floods.

The Council’s website has useful information on flood recovery www.cornwall.gov.uk/coverack and we will be posting updates specifically about what is happening in Coverack. For further information on the road reconstruction see CORMAC’s Coverack page which will be updated daily.

People who wish to make a donation can do so via Cornwall Live’s just giving page https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/CornwallLive and anyone wanting to offer practical help can call the helpline 0800 731 3247.

Story posted 21 July 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Work continues to help Coverack clean up after flash floods

Cornwall Council News feed - Fri, 07/21/2017 - 09:53

Work continued today by Cornwall Council and partner agencies to repair the damage caused by a flash flood through the village of Coverack earlier this week.

Today drains and culverts throughout Coverack and surrounding areas were cleared of debris deposited by the flash floods. All the highways drains in the village have been checked and cleared with staff from the Environment Agency checking all the culverts.

Work continued on repairing the B3294, with heavy plant machinery arriving earlier today to remove the surface of the road so that detailed investigations can be carried out into the damage to the underneath of the carriageway.

The damage caused to the roads by the flash floods means that more than 150 tonnes of rubble has to be removed. Teams from CORMAC have cleared a path through the rubble for construction vehicles to access the site, and will be removing the remainder of the debris over the next few days. The road will remain closed until the repairs have been completed.

The floods have also caused damage to parts of the coast path. The section of coast path at Rosenithon is currently closed, with a diversion in place round the back of Dean Quarry. The rest of the coast path to Coverack from Lowland Point has suffered some damage but is still open. The coast path between Coverack and St Keverne is also closed, as is the section at Sunny Corner.

Councillor Geoff Brown, the Council’s Cabinet Member for Transport, visited the village this morning and praised the work of the agencies and the local community in supporting the recovery operations.

“Staff from all the agencies are working flat out to carry out the clean up and help the village to return to normal as quickly as possible “ he said. “There has been a fantastic response both from the local community and from volunteers and I would like to thank everyone who is working so hard.

“Work on repairing the road is progressing well and I am hopeful that it will be completed quicker than we originally estimated. I said on Wednesday that we were looking at completing the repairs within weeks, rather than months, and I am now hoping that the road will be open in the not too distant future”.

Work is also continuing to support the owners of the 50 properties which were affected by flooding, with skips being provided in the centre of the village. Arrangements are also being put in place to dispose of larger household items, such as sofas and carpets, with anyone needing assistance asked to call the Cornwall Council emergency line on 0800 7313247.

Up to five houses in the village are currently believed to be uninhabitable and staff from the Council’s Localism team are working with partners to find temporary accommodation for people who cannot immediately return home.

Community Link Officers from Cornwall Council have been on hand at the Paris Hotel in Coverack to provide help throughout today, and will also be at the hotel tomorrow, and during next week to provide advice and support.

“Members of the Localism team have been doing a fantastic job of supporting the local community “ said Council Leader Adam Paynter. “They have seen more than 100 people so far, with a wide range of queries and concerns. These range from finding temporary accommodation and disposing of waste, to concerns over accessing their properties because of damage to minor roads and lanes. “

“Members of the Localism team will be based at the Paris hotel between 10 am and 4pm tomorrow, and will also be at the hotel every day next week to provide advice and support”.

Representatives from all the key agencies involved in the clean up will be attending the second residents’ meeting which is being held at the Paris Hotel at 11 am tomorrow morning ( 21 July) to provide an update on the progress which is being made, and answer any questions.

The meeting, which will be hosted by Council Leader Adam Paynter, will also include information on the support which is available for businesses which have been affected by the floods, including council tax relief, and advice from the British Association of Insurers.

The Council is continuing to work with Volunteer Cornwall who will coordinate offers of assistance from members of the community to provide support. Offers of assistance can be reported via 0800 7313247.

The Cornwall Community Foundation has also confirmed that financial assistance can be provided to affected residents needing immediate help. Details on how to access this can be obtained from the Community Link Officers or from the Cornwall Council emergency line - 0800 7313247.

We are working with the local landowners to identify locations to provide temporary parking.

As reported yesterday, potential pollution from a broken sewer line remains a health concern. South West Water has carried out an initial assessment and confirms that there are no reported issues with mains supply drinking water however, the main sewage line has been breached which means the local streams and beach may be contaminated. Precautionary warning signs have been placed near the beach and two local streams while works are carried out to repair the breach.

People are advised not to go near the water and if they come in contact with the water to make sure they wash their hands and follow good hygiene practices. Precautions should also be taken with regards to pets and livestock.

Anyone who gets their drinking water from a private water supply such as a borehole, spring or well which has potentially been covered by floodwater is advised to look out for a change in water quality, such as the water becoming discoloured or there is a change in taste or smell, should assume the water is unsafe to drink unless boiled and should continue to use boiled water for drinking and bathing until the supply has been tested and shown to be safe.

People with private drainage such as septic tank or cess pits are also being advised to have them checked to ensure that they are still operating correctly after the floods.

The Council’s website has useful information on flood recovery www.cornwall.gov.uk/coverack and we will be posting updates specifically about what is happening in Coverack.

People who wish to make a donation can do so via Cornwall Live’s just giving page www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/CornwallLive

Agencies who have been working with Cornwall Council to provide assistance to the Coverack community include CORMAC, Cornwall Fire and Rescue and Community Safety Service, Environment Agency, South West Water, HM Coastguard, Volunteer Cornwall, Public Health Cornwall and Devon and Cornwall Police.

Story posted 20 July 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Don't miss out having your say - take part in this year's annual canvass

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 07/20/2017 - 13:34

Did you miss out on having your say in the recent elections because you were not registered to vote?  You can stop this happening next time by taking part in this year’s annual canvass which begins this week.

This year electoral household enquiry forms will be sent to over 266,000 homes across Cornwall over the next two weeks.

It is a legal requirement to respond to the HEF and we encourage residents to respond as soon as possible and by no later than the end of August. You can use a dedicated internet, or SMS text response services to provide details of any changes or, alternatively, can return your forms by post.

Reminders will be issued to households who have not responded by 1 September. If we still haven’t obtained a response, a canvasser will call at the property. In order to avoid us having to send reminders and call at the property, we encourage residents to assist us in responding by the deadline date.

This information will then be used to update the new electoral register which will be published on 1 December 2017 and contains the names and addresses of people who are eligible to vote in elections.

“It is essential that the Council has the correct information about each household. This means more of our residents at future elections will be able to participate and place their vote,“ said Council Leader Adam Paynter.  “People are required by law to provide the information which is asked for in the forms. While most people respond quickly, we always have a number who do not return their forms. If people look out for the forms and respond promptly then they can help to make savings which can go towards other essential services”.

Unless your name appears on the electoral register, you won’t be able to vote in an election.  If you’re not on the register you’ll also find it difficult when applying for mortgages, loans, insurance or credit, as credit reference agencies use the register to check addresses of applicants.

Anyone not receiving a form should contact the Council’s electoral registration team on 0300 123 1115. 

Story posted 20 July 2017 

Categories: Cornwall

Recovery effort continues today to help Coverack community back on their feet after devastating floods

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 07/20/2017 - 13:12

Cornwall Council and partner agencies are continuing to work with affected residents in Coverack to support recovery operations after the village was hit by devastating floods on Wednesday afternoon.

In total, around 50 properties were affected by the flooding and a small number of people were displaced.

Temporary accommodation is currently being sought for three people who have been displaced and cannot immediately return home.

So residents can access support quickly, Community Link Officers from Cornwall Council will be on hand at the Paris Hotel in Coverack to provide help today and tomorrow between 10am and 4pm.  The Link Officer will coordinate help from multiple agencies where needed, providing a single point of contact.

Residents can also call the Cornwall Council emergency line on 0800 7313247 with any questions, queries and concerns.

A second meeting will also be held to update residents and respond to any questions. This meeting will be held at the Paris Hotel at 11am on Friday 21 July, The meeting will be hosted by Council Leader Adam Paynter.

Councillor Paynter, who visited the site yesterday, said: “The way authorities, businesses and the local community has pulled together in the face of such a devastating event has been remarkable. The response we have seen from all quarters shows the true spirit of Cornwall.  It reflects how we pull together in the face of adversity and highlights the special essence of village communities.

“From partner agencies such as utilities to tourism and waste management, we are united in trying to help rebuild the Coverack community as quickly as possible.  We have also seen generous support from businesses such as Sainsburys who have offered help with food deliveries through to Warren’s Bakery who provided a welcome delivery of pasties yesterday,” he said.

The Cornwall community has been quick to respond to the flash flooding with offers of assistance. The Council is working with Volunteer Cornwall who will coordinate offers of assistance from members of the community to provide support.  Offers of assistance can be reported via 0800 7313247 .

The Cornwall Community Foundation has also confirmed that financial assistance can be provided to affected residents needing immediate help. Details on how to access this can be obtained from the Community Link Officers or from the Cornwall Council emergency line - 0800 7313247.

Following safety checks by utility companies and an assessment yesterday, work to repair the main road in to the village began this morning.

We are working with the local landowners to identify locations to provide temporary parking for residents.

Initial removal of domestic waste was completed yesterday where access was available.  Plans are being drawn up to help residents and businesses dispose of household goods and debris.  Two lockable skips are already on route to the village this morning, with further skips being organised to deal with different types of waste.

As reported yesterday, pollution from a broken sewer line remains a health concern.  South West Water has carried out an initial assessment and confirm that there are no reported issues with mains supply drinking water however, the main sewage line has been breached which means the local streams and beach may be contaminated.  Precautionary warning signs have been placed near the beach and two local streams.

People are advised not to go near the water and if they come in contact with the water to make sure they wash their hands and follow good hygiene practices. Precautions should also be taken with regards to pets and livestock.

Anyone who gets their water from a private water supply such as a borehole, spring or well which has potentially been covered by floodwater is advised to look out for a change in water quality, such as the water becoming discoloured or there is a change in taste or smell, should assume the water is unsafe to drink unless boiled and should continue to use boiled water for drinking and bathing until the supply has been tested and shown to be safe.  

The Council’s website has useful information on flood recovery and we will be posting updates specifically about what is happening in Coverack.

People who wish to make a donation can do so via Cornwall Live’s just giving page.

Agencies who have been working with Cornwall Council to provide assistance to the Coverack community include CORMAC, Cornwall Fire and Rescue and Community Safety Service, Environment Agency, South West Water, HM Coastguard, Volunteer Cornwall, Public Health Cornwall and Devon and Cornwall Police.

Story posted 20 July 2017 

Categories: Cornwall

Council working with Coverack local community to recover from devastating flash flood

Cornwall Council News feed - Wed, 07/19/2017 - 17:44

Cornwall Council and partner agencies have been working around the clock to assess the needs of Coverack residents following a devastating flash flood in the village yesterday afternoon.

While last night’s efforts focussed on immediate safety of residents and holiday makers, today’s focus has moved to assessing the needs of the local community and working to repair infrastructure.  

Cornwall Council hosted a meeting for local residents and visitors at a local hotel this morning to update the community on action being taken after yesterday’s flash floods which badly affected the village, and to further assess what support is needed to help the local community return to normal as quickly as possible. 

Cornwall Council Leader Adam Paynter visited the scene this morning and spoke to local residents at the community meeting: “Thankfully no one was injured in yesterday’s incident but the devastation caused by this extreme localised flash flooding is there for all to see.  I want to pay tribute to all the emergency services who worked so tirelessly to make sure that people were rescued and kept safe.  I also want to say how much we all admire and appreciate the resilience and patience of residents and visitors to the village as we start the clean-up process. We have people on the ground from Council ready to listen to concerns and to feed those back to the recovery group which is co-ordinating action.”

If you are a resident or visitor who has been affected by flooding and need assistance or have questions  you can contact Cornwall Council’s emergency contact line - 0800 731 3247. Community Link Officers from Cornwall Council will also remain in the village for the rest of the week.

The main road in to Coverack is currently impassable with the secondary road, School Lane, single track and narrow. Traffic management has been put in place to ensure traffic flow and a local traffic plan is being put in place, including temporary parking for residents.

A digger has been brought into the village and Environment Agency teams have been brought in to clear debris from the beach and bridges and to assess the impact on waterways.

South West Water has carried out an initial assessment and confirm that there are no reported issues with mains supply drinking water however, the main sewage line has been breached which means the local streams and beach may be contaminated. Precautionary warning signs will be placed near the beach and two local streams today.

People are advised not to go near the water and if they come in contact with the water to make sure they wash their hands and follow good hygiene practices. Precautions should also be taken with regards to pets and livestock.

Anyone who gets their water from a private water supply such as a borehole, spring or well which has potentially been covered by floodwater is advised to look out for a change in water quality, such as the water becoming discoloured or there is a change in taste or smell, should assume the water is unsafe to drink unless boiled and should continue to use boiled water for drinking and bathing until the supply has been tested and shown to be safe.  

A household waste collection was due today so the Council has arranged for special collections to take place.  It is also assessing how best to remove bulky good which have been damaged and needs to be removed.

Crews from Cornwall Fire and Rescue and Community Safety Service were first mobilised into action when the first calls about flooding affecting the village were received at 15.40 yesterday afternoon and maintained a presence overnight.

The Council’s website has useful information on flood recovery and we will be posting updates specifically about what is happening in Coverack.

Cornwall Council has been inundated with offers from people wanting to help with the clean-up. At this stage our priority is to assess people’s needs by door knocking on every home and the best way people can help is by making a donation on Cornwall Live’s just giving page.

Unless they need to travel to Coverack, people are asked to avoid the area while recovery operations are underway.

A range of agencies and the community are working together to develop an action plan to look at longer term recovery.

Story posted 19 July 2017 

Categories: Cornwall

Preferred route for A30 Chiverton to Carland Cross dualling discussed at St Agnes and Perranporth Community Network Panel meeting

Cornwall Council News feed - Wed, 07/19/2017 - 11:22

Residents of the St Agnes and Perranporth Community Network area are invited to hear from Highways England about the A30 Chiverton Cross to Carland Cross improvement scheme at an extra-ordinary Community Network panel meeting on Tuesday 25 July. At the meeting, Highways England will be providing an update on plans to transform this section of the A30 by creating a dual carriageway. The update from Josh Hodder, the new Project Manager for the scheme at Highways England, will include information about the preferred route and what happens next before the construction phase.

The meeting has been set up following the request at the last St Agnes and Perranporth Community Network Panel meeting to have more information and another discussion about the scheme. This is a public meeting and there will be the opportunity for both panel members and the public to ask questions.

Earlier this month, Highways England announced the preferred route for the £290 million scheme. Once completed, the new eight mile stretch of dual carriageway between Chiverton and Carland Cross will help to improve journey times for many residents, businesses and visitors, and help unlock one of the last bottlenecks in Cornwall.

The Chair, Councillor Ken Yeo of Perranzabuloe Parish Council, said: “The network panel meeting is a good opportunity to hear the latest from Highways England about the scheme to create a dual carriageway between Chiverton Cross and Carland Cross on the A30. Everyone is welcome to this well-timed public meeting which follows the recent announcement from Highways England on the preferred route. This is a good opportunity for people to better understand the scheme and how it will affect them in the future. Please come and meet local Parish and Cornwall Councillors.”

The St Agnes and Perranporth Panel meets bi-monthly. They discuss matters that affect the local area and agree priorities that can be delivered by Cornwall Council and its partners such as the police and health services.

Some of the areas that community networks across Cornwall focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The St Agnes and Perranporth Community Network Panel includes all the Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the six Parish Councils (Crantock, Cubert, Perranzabuloe, St Agnes, St Allen, St Newlyn East) in the community network area.

The meeting is on Tuesday 26 July 2017 from 6.30pm to 8.30pm at Perranzabuloe Parish Rooms, Chyanhale, Ponsmere Valley, Perranporth, TR6 0DB. The agenda and more information about the community network panel can be found on the St Agnes and Perranporth Community Network webpage

19 July 2017

Categories: Cornwall

Cornwall supports new "Proud to Care" campaign to champion care workers

Cornwall Council News feed - Tue, 07/18/2017 - 13:17

Cornwall Council has joined local authorities from across the South West to support a new campaign to raise the profile of care and the positive role of care workers in a drive to recruit the right people to the sector.

The Proud to Care South West campaign, launched today (Monday, 17 July), sees 16 local authorities working with Health Education England to establish for the first time a regional approach to raising the profile of care.

Care providers across the country often experience difficulties in recruiting, which, in turn, affects the availability of care to people who could be living independently at home, or in care homes.

It's a challenge that local authorities want to address by making people aware of how rewarding and worthwhile care work is as a career choice, and encouraging the positive image that care deserves.

An especially inspiring element to the campaign is the first-hand personal accounts from real care and support workers, who talk passionately about their love for care work.  The Proud to Care South West website features interviews with care and support workers, and links to recruitment portals where care providers across the region advertise their vacancies.

Rob Rotchell, Cornwall Council’s Cabinet Member for Adults, is a firm supporter of the new campaign. "Health and Social Care is facing unprecedented demand and this pressure is set to increase in the years ahead.

“A vital factor in dealing with this demand is the recruitment and retention of highly motivated, skilled workforce that is valued and rewarded properly. Cornwall has a proud tradition for caring and I have no doubt will rise to this challenge. 

“As someone who has been directly involved in care all my career I'm happy to say I'm "Proud to Care" "

The campaign is also being supported by Trevor Doughty, Cornwall Council’s Strategic Director for Children, Families and Adults, who said “Working in the care sector and helping to enhance a person’s quality of life is hugely rewarding and we want to encourage more people to consider careers in this area.  

“We are already working with care providers to help them to recruit and retain staff and we are looking forward to building on this strong partnership to demonstrate that Cornwall is Proud to Care.

"This campaign plays a key role in helping to recognise and celebrate the value and commitment of care and support workers and we hope that people will visit the campaign website, listen to the real stories and be inspired to apply for any of the vacancies now available."

The campaign wants to reach all potential care workers, but is specifically targeting key audiences, including younger people and those who have studied for a health and social care qualification; parents considering a return to work; people aged 50 plus who, with more life experience might want to give something back to their community; and students seeking employment over holiday periods.

It's also gained national support from the Association of Directors of Adult Social Care, Skills for Care and Skills for Health. 

Story posted 17 July 2017 

Categories: Cornwall

Earlier help to prevent people becoming rough sleepers

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 07/17/2017 - 16:13

A new £1.1 million approach to preventing and reducing rough sleeping by improving greater access to transitional housing and support services was launched today.  

The multi-agency rough sleeper reduction strategy will work to prevent rough sleeping in the first instance by helping those most at risk, help new rough sleepers quickly access housing, help and support to get off the streets as well as identify and provide support for entrenched rough sleepers to help them off the streets permanently. 

The strategy will be delivered by Cornwall Council, Cornwall Housing Ltd, Coastline Housing, Voluntary Sector Providers, Safer Cornwall, the Drug and Alcohol Action Team, Devon & Cornwall Police, Public Health (including Mental Health Services) and Inclusion Cornwall.

The strategy is backed by £1.1 million in funding - £850,000 from Cornwall Council and Cornwall Housing and £292,000 from a successful bid to the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) for Nos Da Kernow (No First Night Out).      

Cornwall Council Cabinet member for homes Andrew Mitchell said: “It is frightening how quickly someone can find themselves faced with the prospect of sleeping rough. In Cornwall, as in other parts of the country, we have seen an increase in homelessness and the continuing impacts of welfare reform mean that more people are at risk of becoming homeless. 

“This new strategy means earlier help to people who are in desperate need of accommodation and support and placing them on a path that will not involve worrying about their safety at night because they are forced to sleep rough.”

The strategy will also see more joined up support from outreach teams, specialist agencies and housing providers for existing rough sleepers many of whom have complex needs and housing histories who need specialist support to help them to move away from the streets permanently.

A key element of the strategy is to provide stable housing to help get people back on their feet, and then provide wraparound support services which people  need to keep their housing and avoid becoming homeless again.

The Council and its partners have been working on a number of initiatives since September last year to begin the process of reducing rough sleeping in Cornwall, including Nos Da Kernow. This programme involves a team of experienced outreach, housing options and resettlement officers from Cornwall Housing, Coastline and St Petroc’s Society working together to combine knowledge and skills to help those who are facing pressures that could tip them over into rough sleeping. The approach is already making a difference to people like Dave and Louise.

Dave fell into rent arrears after losing his job, he had no relatives or friends to help him and was at serious risk of having to sleep rough. Nos Da Kernow (No First Night Out)) arranged for £300 of the arrears to paid off by a charity and then put together a manageable repayment plan for Dave to re-pay the charity. The landlord was happy with this arrangement and Dave was able to stay in his home.

Louise was sofa surfing after being asked to leave the family home and was referred to Nos Da Kernow, who provided one of the bedspaces attached to the project, which helped Louise move on into supported accommodation and prevented her from having to sleep rough.

“Having a safe and secure place to stay and access to the support they need will help people to start to re-build their lives.  This is especially true for some entrenched rough sleepers that have not been able to access or stay in housing in the past because of their sometimes chaotic lifestyle.

“We saw the number of people found sleeping rough on one night drop from 99 last November to 82 in May this year – but we know homelessness can often be hidden and changing this will take time. Partnership working is critical to tackling this national problem,” Councillor Mitchell said.

Another key element of the strategy is the ‘Housing First’ approach which provides independent, stable housing as the foundation for enabling people with multiple and complex needs to then receive wrap around services and get their lives back on track. Two additional outreach workers alongside the existing St Petroc’s team are now in place to work with rough sleepers and to develop a ‘Housing First’ approach in Cornwall.

St Petroc’s Chief Executive Steve Ellis said: “St Petroc’s look forward to working together with our colleagues at Cornwall Council, Coastline and other partners to reduce the number of homeless across the county. The new early intervention service will, I am sure, have a significant impact in the coming months.”

Cornwall Housing’s Director of Housing Options, Cathy Hadfield said: “This is a great example of working together in tackling homelessness and rough sleeping head on. The strong focus on prevention and early intervention is key. The earlier we are able to assist someone the better chance we have of preventing the next step resulting in sleeping rough.” 

People at risk of homelessness or worried about their housing situation can contact the advice team at Cornwall Housing on 0300 1234 161.

Members of the public who have concerns about a rough sleeper in their area should go to the Streetlink website or phone Streetlink on 0300 500 0914. The rough sleeper will be contacted by the Street Outreach Team within 24 hours and offered advice, assistance and support to find accommodation.  

People who wish to donate should give directly to one of the organisations officially helping people, such as St Petroc’s.  

Story posted 17 July 2017

Categories: Cornwall

New Council homes for local people in Cornwall

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 07/17/2017 - 15:16

18 new Council homes in St Anns Chapel, Gunnislake will soon be ready for new tenants to move in. The homes will be managed by Cornwall Housing and are for social rent. The homes will be advertised in phases on Cornwall Homechoice as they become available.

Cornwall Housing’s Development and Regeneration manager, Michelle Richards said, “We are really pleased with how these new homes are progressing. We have already been able to advertise four of the one-bed flats on Cornwall Homechoice for applicants to bid on. The homes are built to a high standard, and we know that fuel poverty is a real issue in Cornwall, so along with an efficient gas central heating system - all the homes are well insulated to ensure optimum energy efficiency.”

The 18 new builds consist of:

  • 8 x 1 bed flats
  • 6 x 2 bed houses
  • 3 x 3 bed houses
  • 1 x 4 bed house

All properties will have an allocated parking space and small garden area.

Cornwall Council Cabinet Member for homes Andrew Mitchell, said,“Demand for decent social housing in Cornwall is very high, so I am pleased that these new Council funded homes will go some way to addressing that demand. The new homes in St Anns Chapel are not only of a high quality, but they will be set at a social rent for local people in Cornwall. We are looking forward to having all 18 new properties completed with tenants settling in and making a home.”

Nick Cross, Interim Operations Director for Cornwall Housing said: “This development is another successful example of working together to positively address the needs of local people registered on Homechoice. However, we recognise that Homechoice may not be a realistic solution for everyone, as social housing has to go to those in greatest need. People who may struggle to access housing on Homechoice may not be aware of the many other options that are available to them.”

Cornwall Housing’s Voids Control Manager, Lydia Stevens said, “These homes are being built for those on the housing register who have a local connection to the parish of Calstock. Unfortunately, on the first round of bidding for the one bed flats we had very few bids from people who meet the 1st priority local connection to Calstock . This means that we will now be looking at applicants’ bids that meet the 2nd priority which is a connection to a parish adjoining Calstock.

If you are local, we would strongly encourage you to bid on Thursday 10 August when we will be advertising 2 x 1 bed flats and 2 x 2 bed houses on Cornwall Homechoice. If you want more information, we have set up a dedicated page on our website about these new homes and details of when they will be advertised."

The Cornwall Housing Facebook page will post information as and when each phase is completed and ready to be advertised on Cornwall Homechoice.

Story posted 14 July 2017 

Categories: Cornwall

Cornwall celebrates second anniversary of historic Devolution Deal

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 07/17/2017 - 12:28

Three years after launching the "Standing up for Cornwall" campaign and then becoming the first rural local authority in the country to be offered a devolution deal, we are celebrating the second anniversary of our historic deal which is making a real difference to the lives of local residents and businesses.

Following the Scottish referendum in 2015 the Council was determined to be at the forefront of the growing momentum for local authorities in England to be given greater powers and freedoms.  After listening to local residents and businesses, we started drafting a Case for Cornwall based on the things people had said needed improving.  These included fairer levels of funding for all public services, better maintained roads and improved bus services, more affordable homes for local people, and additional powers to grow the economy, create new jobs and improve employment and skills.

After testing these "asks" through a successful #standupforCornwall social media campaign, public meetings and a survey, they were included in the final Case for Cornwall which formed the basis of our negotiations with the Government.

On 16 July 2015 the Government announced that we had become the first rural local authority to be given a devolution deal, with the Prime Minister and Communities Secretary travelling to Cornwall to support the signing of the formal agreement. 

"Two years ago we welcomed Prime Minister David Cameron and the Communities Secretary Greg Clark to Cornwall for the formal signing of our historic Deal," said Adam Paynter, the Leader of Cornwall Council.

"Our Deal was about giving Cornwall more control over how we deliver the services that are important to residents and businesses, including transport, education and health.  It was the first step in securing more powers and flexibilities for Cornwall and ensuring that decisions over important services are taken closer to the people that they are delivered to.

"I am very proud that the achievements we have made and the foundations we have put in place over the past two years are now helping to create thriving communities, and deliver sustainable and fairer funding and increased prosperity."

The Deal agreed in 2015 covered a range of key areas, including transport, employment and skills, EU funding, business support, energy, health and social care, public buildings, and heritage and culture, with a number of exciting "firsts" for Cornwall.

These included the proposals for transport which would see us become the first rural authority in the country to be given powers to franchise bus services.  Other "firsts" included an agreement on European Union funding which would give Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly Intermediate Body status, ensuring that decisions on allocating EU funding to projects would be made locally rather than at Westminster and a commitment by the Government to work with the Council and the LEP to join up national and local business support services to make it easier for local businesses to find the support they need. 

So what has been achieved over the past two years?

The simple answer is that significant achievements have been made in all areas of the Deal, with particular successes in improving public transport with new buses and helping businesses access the support they need to grow more easily:

Transport – Over £10.7m has been invested by bus operators into brand new buses during the last 12 months, with more new buses planned for 2017/18 and 2019/20. This has led to people taking 700,000 more journeys by bus.  Passengers will be able to use SMART ticketing and contactless payment options in August, with the new smart tickets able to be used on both trains and buses. Information on bus times is now 'live' and passengers will soon be able to access an on-line and mobile Transport Journey Planner, which includes the ability to buy a ticket.  We now have control over spending a £126m budget in Cornwall which means we can shape transport services more effectively to join up journeys and better meet the needs of our residents..

Energy – Being energy rich Cornwall has the ability to become self-sufficient in energy, and through local control we can keep the benefits of these resources. We have now invested in two pilot new clean energy sources using European funds – wave and deep geothermal – both if successful will be brand new energy sectors for the UK, as well as a Heat Network pilot.  We have also set up an 'enterprise zone' to help businesses involved in clean energy establish their companies and employ local people. 

Employment and Skills – We have refreshed our Employment and Skills Strategy, which includes an apprenticeship strategy and sets out our vision to 2030.  The Skills Access Hub is now live and will be aligned to the Growth Hub to support businesses with their skills and development needs.  We have published the 'Cornwall Careers Offer' and successfully secured additional funding to recruit Enterprise Co-ordinators around clusters of schools and focus  resources on Special Schools and alternative provision.

Keeping money in Cornwall – We are one of only a handful of regions in the UK who can now keep all of the business rates we raise. This does not mean that we will get more money, but it does mean that we have more control of the money that will help pay for services in Cornwall.

European money – We now have control over the way that European funds are spent in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly. This means we can now make sure that funds are matched to local priorities, and we can decide on the projects that best meet these local needs. There are still tens of millions of pounds to be spent, and our Devolution Deal has ensured that these funds will be used in a way that will most benefit Cornwall. These funds will create thousands of jobs and support hundreds of businesses. 

Improving Cornish homes – New ways of improving insulation in Cornish homes agreed with the Government means we have more control over deciding which homes can receive this support. The fund for this work is likely to be worth up to £3m which will make a real difference to the lives of hundreds of people currently living in cold and damp homes.  This is an exciting new scheme which has been delivered as a direct result of our Deal.

Health and social care – Some elements of devolution take longer to deliver.  The foundations are being put in place for the delivery of more joined up health and social care services. Partners from health, public health and the Council are all working together to develop plans to help people stay as healthy as possible, support people to remain independent and well in their community and make the system more sustainable.  We are also investigating how the work we are taking forward locally can be supported and enhanced by our devolution status by seeking freedoms and flexibilities, more control and ownership over health and care related budgets and possibly transition funding. 

Emergency services working together – Our Deal has allowed us to bring our ambulance, fire and police emergency services across Cornwall together.  We now have joined up 'blue-light' services in places like Hayle and Truro. By locating and training staff from different agencies together, these services are providing a more joined up response to local situations. We are also joining up other services, such as Job Centre Plus with Council offices. This means that a wider range of services can be accessed in a single location, reducing the costs of owning or leasing different buildings considerably.

Helping local businesses to grow – Our Devolution Deal has led to the creation of new, easier to access support systems for local businesses.  The development of the Growth Hub and its links with other programmes has helped over 8,000 businesses in Cornwall to grow and develop. Having more control over how we support business, rather than adopting national systems, means we have been able to target help to meet demand in the most simple and effective way.

Changing the way we work with partners – We have changed the way we work with partners and the Government to look after our heritage and protect the countryside and homes from flooding. We have new partnerships in place that are creating exciting new plans that will allow us to better manage our heritage and invest in ways to prevent flooding for many years to come. These arrangements have revolutionised the way we work, and have set the foundations for potential future devolution asks.

One of the key areas to benefit from the Devolution Deal has been business, with significant improvements in the support available to help local businesses to grow.

"The launch of the Growth Hub a year ago means it is easier for businesses to find advice and support, and this will soon be followed by a Skills Hub to match them with the right skills," said Mark Duddridge, the Chairman of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership.  "We are working with schools, colleges and employers to improve careers advice for young people and make sure employment and training schemes fit Cornwall better.

"Thanks to Government support, Cornwall now has a Low Carbon Enterprise Zone to attract jobs and investment, and early next year will see the launch of a multi-million pound investment fund to support business growth.  Greater say over local transport funding is also transforming our bus and rail services, and enhancing other infrastructure investment."

So what of the future for Cornwall’s historic Devolution Deal ?

"We are delivering on the promises in the Deal and have an exciting year ahead as local residents and businesses see the real impact of the Deal on their lives," said Adam Paynter.  "These include saving council taxpayers’ money by sharing buildings with our public sector partners, providing new buses and developing tickets which can be used on both buses and trains, and supporting local businesses to grow.

"We will continue to be ambitious and will be working with the Government to identify potential areas of future devolution, particularly around housing, planning powers, future funding opportunities for Cornwall and integrating our education, health and social care services.  Whilst also assessing the potential impact of Brexit and the opportunities this offers for devolved powers from Brussels. 

"We said in 2015 that the signing of the Deal was not the end of the development of the Case for Cornwall – it was very much the beginning.  Devolution remains a journey; an exciting journey that we want all stakeholders and residents in Cornwall to share."

Story posted 17 July 2017

Categories: Cornwall

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